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The Economics Of San Diego's Water Supply

Today’s program covered many important issues, but it’s important for the public to know that the Water Authority, the region’s wholesale water supplier, has been aggressively moving to diversify the region’s water supplies for years.

It is true it’s very important that the region reduce its dependence on any single water supply. That’s why the Water Authority for close to 20 years has been executing a visionary, long-term strategy to diversify its supply sources and improve regional water infrastructure.

Under that strategy, we are transforming the region’s supply portfolio. In 1991, we were 95% dependent on one imported source – the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. By 2020 our plan is for local supplies and conservation meet 40% of the region’s water needs, with another 30% of supply coming from highly reliable imported supplies in the form of long-term Colorado River water transfers. In 2010, we are well on our way toward meeting that supply diversification goal.

It’s important to note that all imported water supplies do not have the same costs or vulnerability to regulatory restrictions. The Water Authority’s long-term Colorado River water transfers, water-conserving canal-lining agreements and a water conservation and transfer agreement with the Imperial Irrigation District, are a cornerstone of the region’s diversification strategy in part because those supplies are not subject to supply cutbacks by MWD. These transfers already are improving the region’s water reliability, offsetting a significant portion of the water supply cuts we’ve experienced for more than a year from MWD.

There is no single water supply “silver bullet” that will meet all of San Diego County’s present and future water needs. That’s why our strategy balances cost-effectiveness, practicality and reliability, and includes options ranging from water transfers, to conservation, to surface water storage, to groundwater recovery, to water recycling to desalination. The Water Authority will be updating our strategy to reflect changing conditions through development of our 2010 Urban Water Management Plan, which we are required by law to update every five years.

More information about current water supply conditions and the Water Authority’s supply diversification strategy is available here: http://www.sdcwa.org/pdf/WaterSupplyO...

Bob Yamada
Water Resources Manager
San Diego County Water Authority

July 20, 2010 at 5:04 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

The Economics Of San Diego's Water Supply

Today’s program covered many important issues, but it’s important for the public to know that the Water Authority, the region’s wholesale water supplier, has been aggressively moving to diversify the region’s water supplies for years.

It is true it’s very important that the region reduce its dependence on any single water supply. That’s why the Water Authority for close to 20 years has been executing a visionary, long-term strategy to diversify its supply sources and improve regional water infrastructure.

Under that strategy, we are transforming the region’s supply portfolio. In 1991, we were 95% dependent on one imported source – the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. By 2020 our plan is for local supplies and conservation meet 40% of the region’s water needs, with another 30% of supply coming from highly reliable imported supplies in the form of long-term Colorado River water transfers. In 2010, we are well on our way toward meeting that supply diversification goal.

It’s important to note that all imported water supplies do not have the same costs or vulnerability to regulatory restrictions. The Water Authority’s long-term Colorado River water transfers, water-conserving canal-lining agreements and a water conservation and transfer agreement with the Imperial Irrigation District, are a cornerstone of the region’s diversification strategy in part because those supplies are not subject to supply cutbacks by MWD. These transfers already are improving the region’s water reliability, offsetting a significant portion of the water supply cuts we’ve experienced for more than a year from MWD.

There is no single water supply “silver bullet” that will meet all of San Diego County’s present and future water needs. That’s why our strategy balances cost-effectiveness, practicality and reliability, and includes options ranging from water transfers, to conservation, to surface water storage, to groundwater recovery, to water recycling to desalination. The Water Authority will be updating our strategy to reflect changing conditions through development of our 2010 Urban Water Management Plan, which we are required by law to update every five years.

More information about current water supply conditions and the Water Authority’s supply diversification strategy is available here: http://www.sdcwa.org/pdf/WaterSupplyO...

Bob Yamada
Water Resources Manager
San Diego County Water Authority

July 20, 2010 at 5:04 p.m. ( | suggest removal )