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City Heights High Schoolers Are Prepping To Become Your Next Doctor

February 5, 2019 1:39 p.m.

GUEST: Tarryn Mento, City Heights reporter, KPBS News

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Transcript:

This is a rush transcript created by a contractor for KPBS to improve accessibility for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. Please refer to the media file as the formal record of this interview. Opinions expressed by guests during interviews reflect the guest’s individual views and do not necessarily represent those of KPBS staff, members or its sponsors.

I'm Maureen Cavanaugh. A number of studies warn about the shortage of health care workers over the next decade. Those concerns have even been voiced in Congress. K PBS reporter Taryn Manto says a San Diego program is tapping high schoolers to help fill the gaps and put them on the path to good paying jobs.

Got to make sure you wash your hands. Nurse Whitney a button perhaps to make her rounds at Rady Children's Hospital. And today she's not alone. Hoover High School student you had direct kills around follows closely behind the to gear up with gloves and head into the room of a young patient. What's your name.

Isaiah Isaiah. Nice to meet you.

So we're just going to do some vital cyberbullying checks his temperature blood pressure and asks about his appetite. All the while she narrates what she's doing to Calderon and fields her questions.

Toughen the take down. Blood pressure is at every every time you check in.

Yes. So each patient is different.

So the doctors will write certain parameters lists shadowing experience is just one of several that Calderon received during the semester. The high school senior is part of the faces for the Future program that provides in the field learning for students from underserved communities that includes San Diego City Heights neighborhood in eight other cities across the U.S. such as Oakland and Detroit. And our goal is that these kids graduate from college and get a well-paying job in the health care field. Mary Beth Moran oversees.