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Ideas to Keep San Diego Students Off The ‘Summer Slide’

Ideas to Keep San Diego Students Off Summer Slide

GUESTS:

Jessica Rapp-McCreary, principal in residence, Learning and Leadership Division, San Diego County Office of Education

Alicia Butters, professional learning and research coordinator, Integrated Technology Service, San Diego County Office of Education

Transcript

Online Summer Learning Resources:

Scratch: Programming (3rd to 9th grades)

Scratch Jr: Programming for younger kids (Pre-K to 3rd)

App Inventor: Make your own smartphone app

instructibles: How-To's on almost everything

Minute Physics YouTube channel: short and interesting physics lessons

ixl.com: Math problems for all ages

Every spring, young eager minds leave behind the confines of the classroom for the freedom of summer.

Teachers in San Diego and around the nation see the results of the so-called “summer learning loss" or "summer slide,” when students return to classrooms with sluggish and dull minds after months of lazy summer days.

Reports show many students lose two months of grade equivalency in math and low-income students can lose an additional two months of reading skills.

Jessica Rapp-McCeary, principal in residence for San Diego County Office of Education‘s Learning and Leadership Division, said the summer slide could also set teachers back in the classom.

“Usually there will be quite a few reading lessons that will be held to get kids in various levels of reading caught up,” McCeary told KPBS Midday Edition on Wednesday. “Reading is usually the first concern especially with elementary school students. Typically it’s the lack of practice that will have them slide a little bit.”

Alicia Butters, professional learning and research coordinator for San Diego County Office of Education’s Integrated Technology Service, encouraged parents to utilize technology to help children from sliding.

For example, she suggested having students use Instagram to document their summer but also have them write about each photo.

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