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Election Roundup: The Results And What They Mean For San Diego County

Photo caption: Karly King, 15, gives a thumbs up at Golden Hall in downtown San Diego, Nov. ...

Photo by Milan Kovacevic

Karly King, 15, gives a thumbs up at Golden Hall in downtown San Diego, Nov. 8, 2016.

We're sorry. This audio clip is no longer available. A transcript has been made available.

The 2016 election is over. The nation has a new president, California gets a new senator and marijuana is legal.

On Wednesday, KPBS Midday Edition breaks down how the results could affect San Diegans.

Voter turnout in San Diego County

Election officials anticipated that nearly three-quarters of the San Diego region's registered voters would cast votes. San Diego County Registrar of Voters Michael Vu predicted between 72 and 77 percent of eligible voters would cast ballots here.

Vu discusses turnout and when a final tally will be reached on close races.

Races

Despite San Diego County voters rallying behind Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump will be the 45th president of the United States.

Kamala Harris is set to be California's next senator.

Longtime Congressman Darrell Issa, R-Vista, appears to have won re-election after a hard fought race against Democratic newcomer Doug Applegate.

San Diego County Supervisor Dave Roberts, a Democrat, is holding on to a slight lead in his tight race against Republican challenger Kristin Gaspar.

Georgette Gomez is leading in the race for the San Diego City Council District 9 seat.

We talk about the races from president to city council.

Propositions and measures

Photo caption: Recently harvested marijuana buds dry at a farm near Garberville, Calif., Oct...

Photo by Associated Press

Recently harvested marijuana buds dry at a farm near Garberville, Calif., Oct. 12, 2016.

Californians voted to legalize recreational marijuana, but said no to repealing the death penalty and yes to speeding up executions.

San Diego County voters rejected Measure B, the Lilac Hills development in Valley Center that would have gone against the county community plan for the area. Voters also denied Measure A, an increase in the sales tax that would have funded transportation projects in the county.

San Diegans said no to Measure C, which would have increased the hotel tax to pay for a new Chargers stadium downtown. They voted to approve Measures K and L. Measure K will require mandatory runoffs in November, while Measure L will require citizen's initiatives and referenda to be voted on in November.

We discuss what the results of the propositions and measures mean.

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