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Cory Briggs

No

NoFor decades, politicians have cut funding for programs that would prevent the need for law-enforcement intervention and used that money for pet projects. The solution is to end the pet projects and restore the funding for social programs that relieve the stress and unnecessary reliance on law-enforcement officials to respond to situations that could have been prevented in the first place.

Yes

YesThe federal and state governments should be providing this funding first. Local agencies and taxpayers are already stretched thin.

Other

OtherYes, but only after a robust public-education campaign. Some of the rules are changing quickly, from week to week if not day to day, and people must be given a chance to understand those rules before being punished for breaking them. But people who know they're breaking legitimate rules should be held accountable.

Yes

YesThe USPS should be protected from politics so that our democratic institutions do not suffer. At the same time, it should be subject to the same scrutiny that any public agency receives so that it runs as efficiently and transparently as possible.

Yes

YesThe City Attorney should provide the City Council with advice about legal changes that affect the City's current rules and require them to be updated. The City Attorney should also recommend legal updates to protect taxpayers from fraud and corruption and to increase transparency and accountability.

No

No

No

NoOne exception for my answer would be when there is a federal lawsuit that affects the City's interests, in which case the City Council should be promptly made aware of the situation and counseled accordingly.

Other

OtherThe federal appellate court has ruled that it is unconstitutional to prosecute people if they cannot afford shelter and if there is no free shelter available. Until the City provides shelter to people who cannot afford it, it would violate my oath to uphold the constitution to move forward with such prosecutions. Those who are merely taking advantage of the situation should be held accountable.

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OtherThe municipal code currently prohibits short-term rentals. Whether to lift the ban is a policy question to be answered by the Mayor and City Council.

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Mara Elliott

Yes

YesLaw enforcement has an essential role to play in keeping communities safe, but it’s also time for a more comprehensive approach to public safety that includes social services, diversion programs and community investment. We must break the cycle of incarceration and provide low level offenders with a meaningful opportunity to get back on track, while addressing underlying inequality and discrimination in underserved communities. As City Attorney, I have introduced programs that provide job training, drug treatment, housing, counseling, and other wrap-around services instead of a debilitating criminal record. Investing in our community is essential to achieving lasting criminal justice reform. We know that when we invest in neighborhoods, the crime rate declines while saving taxpayers money. Criminal justice reform programs that offer social services provide the path for real change and I will continue to seek more of these opportunities.

Yes

YesThe coronavirus has created an economic crisis that will impact our communities for decades to come. At the beginning of the pandemic, my office acted swiftly to protect tenants by drafting the eviction moratorium that was quickly approved by the City Council on March 25. We also worked with the City Council to create a rental assistance program aimed at helping those impacted by the pandemic to avoid homelessness. Housing is a human right and a moral necessity. Earlier this year, the Family Justice Center, my office’s support unit for victims of domestic violence and sex trafficking, partnered with local organizations to provide cash assistance to those in need.

Yes

YesIn order to keep San Diegans safe during the health emergency, my office quickly enforced the Governor’s executive order and proactively cancelled events in parks and on City-leased property. Since then, we have continued to hold violators of these critical public health orders accountable, laying down the law on the most flagrant wrongdoers. Most reported violations have been handled through contact with the alleged violators and education, not punishment, because our goal is to gain compliance and keep communities healthy. We’ve pursued legal action when our attempts to gain compliance through education have failed. We must do everything we can to protect our residents and end the spread of the virus.

Other

OtherThe United States Postal Service has been a crucial institution connecting all Americans with each other and the world. They don’t just deliver mail; they deliver medicine to veterans and seniors, safeguard important and valuable items, and provide affordable access to others worldwide. And importantly, they deliver our election ballots, something we will appreciate this year more than any other due to the challenges brought on by the pandemic. Much is at stake in this election and we cannot sabotage the Postal Service while they are preparing to deliver hundreds of millions of ballots to voters and then return them to county registrars. Any organizational realignment must keep the principles of reliable delivery times, universal coverage, and six-day delivery intact.

Yes

YesSan Diegans elected me to protect our city and its families, and when I see a need for legislation to keep San Diegans safe, I act and propose legislation to the Council. For example, I authored the City’s Safe Storage of Firearms Ordinance to strengthen our gun safety laws and prevent avoidable child gun deaths. I also worked with the San Diego Police Department and the City Council to expand the City's Social Host Ordinance to include marijuana and other controlled substances. The law holds party hosts accountable for allowing minors to use these drugs at social gatherings. And most recently, I proposed repealing the City’s antiquated sedition laws from the City’s Code.

Yes

YesThe City’s Smart Streetlight program has proven to be a valuable crime-fighting tool that’s helped the San Diego Police Department solve roughly 250 crimes, including murders, sexual assaults, carjackings, and hate crimes. And the public should know that no one outside the city has access to the footage, it can never be sold, and all footage is deleted after 5 days. My office is working with the City Council on a comprehensive privacy rights ordinance to further strengthen regulations on Smart Streetlights and ensure San Diegans’ privacy is protected. Ultimately, policy decisions on the program will be made by the Mayor and City Council, but I don’t believe San Diego has to choose between protecting public safety and ensuring privacy rights.

Yes

YesAs City Attorney, I’ve led San Diego’s efforts to join lawsuits to hold lead paint companies accountable for exposing children to toxic chemicals, force corporate polluters to clean up San Diego Bay, and put the city on record for equal rights for LGBTQ people. Bringing litigation against the federal government to hold it accountable for cross-border sewage spills that harm our waters and our health is an action I’m particularly proud of. I’ve taken heat from special interests and my opponents for standing up for our values, but I believe protecting our basic rights and core values is exactly what San Diego elected me to do.

No

NoLaw enforcement has an important role to play in protecting all San Diegans’ safety, but to truly tackle the homelessness crisis we need comprehensive solutions that include treatment, mental health services, and housing. My office is playing a leading role in helping homeless individuals struggling with drug addiction end their cycles of arrest and jail with a program we call SMART - because it is. SMART started with a dozen beds and has grown steadily, offering housing, treatment and counseling to some of San Diego’s most difficult cases. Our 81-bed SMART house in the South Bay is currently being used to safely house homeless families during the pandemic.

No

NoTwo years ago, the City Council passed common-sense short term rental regulations, which they quickly repealed after threats of a referendum by the industry. That was a mistake. San Diego needs rules on the books that allow neighborhoods to be for neighbors while ensuring homeowners the opportunity to use legitimate home sharing to make ends meet. My office recently shut down an out of control short term rental that was being used as a COVID party house. It took us months of investigations and legal work to prosecute that case as a nuisance - too long - because the city still doesn’t short term rental ordinance. That needs to change.

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Noli Zosa

No

NoWe cannot take a chance on diverting much needed funds from our hard working police officers to do their job. We've already seen the affect that this has done in the city of Minneapolis where the crime rate is surging since the city council voted to defund the police.

No

NoI support federal relief for those unemployed due to the COVID pandemic but local governments are already extremely overstretched. We shouldn't be paying landlords at the expenses of funding our critical city services and paying our city employees to keep the city running.

Other

OtherCitations should only be a last resort for egregious violations of public health orders. Small businesses have led the way in self enforcing mask wearing and other restrictions. As a restaurant owner, we enforce these orders everyday so we can stay in business and keep our customers and staff safe. Safety is our number one priority.

Yes

YesThe postal system is a vital service to every community and we must ensure its survival. Government programs inherently have inefficiencies and could use reforms so the postal service should look for ways to be more efficient and cost effective since public dollars subsidize their operations.

Yes

YesI think transparency is extremely important to ensure that any alleged misconduct is investigated to the fullest. This is a necessary step in order to accomplish that.

Yes

YesWe need to raise the funds needed to expand the convention center so that our city can host larger conventions. We cannot afford to lose anymore conventions than the ones we have already lost due to the Coronavirus pandemic. This tax is funded by out of town visitors and not by San Diego residents. The sales tax percentage will put San Diego on par with most other major tourist cities. The revenue generated from this hotel room tax is also critically needed to fund homeless services and infrastructure.

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OtherAny increased housing density and height limits must fit with the community character and must have extensive community input in regards to any proposed changes. There are certain areas along transit lines where increasing housing density makes sense such as in certain areas of Grantville next to the trolley line.

Other

OtherWe should have designated areas in the city where people can park their cars to stay overnight. In those areas, the city can work to provide supportive services for those individuals living in their car to get them the help they need. But people should not be allowed to pull their car or RV in front of someone's house for an indefinite period of time.

Other

OtherI generally say that four per city council district makes sense but there are certain areas in the city which have a lot of areas zoned for commercial or industrial use. For those areas, it will be up to the community with extensive input to decide whether more cannabis dispensaries would be appropriate.

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Toni Duran

Yes

YesI support redirecting police department funding to social workers, one on one homeless outreach, and family reunification programs. Reallocating funding might mean also reallocating unnecessary jobs in the police department and moving those positions, or funding, into after-school programs, libraries and other services to support our communities. With more than half of the City's budget, we need to say yes to rethinking the department entirely and how it operates from top to bottom. The city realigns budget priorities all the time. Decreasing the police budget is not anti-police and does not need to threaten our safety.

Yes

YesIn my current role working for Senate Pro Tem Toni Atkins, I hear from residents every day about their personal budget shortfalls due to COVID-19. I believe that this is the time for government to step up and support those most in need. This is also a way to relieve the burden from the landlords who also need to pay their bills.

Yes

YesI think there is a clear difference between a business like "The Gym" in Pacific Beach and the person walking in Balboa Park who forgot a mask. I do feel that an escalated warning system is proper and those egregious violators should be held accountable for the sake of safety and public health. The City needs clear guidance from the County on how to conduct this enforcement. Additionally, the County should provide resources to assist with COVID-19 enforcement.

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Yes

YesI support Measure B and the creation of a new independent commission to review police practices. Additionally, I will ensure it receives proper funding.

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Yes

YesI want to work with each community planning group, town council, and walk door to door to find the right solutions for our neighborhoods. It's clear that we are in a housing crisis and we need to find new ways to house folks. This is a good example of why I support Measure E. Measure E is community driven and places housing and community in a community that is asking for it.

No

NoThe vehicle habitation ordinance that was passed by the City Council works to criminalize those who have less and puts the burden on them to find help. We need to be saying “we don’t want you to live in your car, we want to help you, if you park over here for the night that's okay, let’s work together.” We need to stop putting band aids on problems and start listening to those who are struggling to find real solutions that work.

Yes

YesThe roll out of these permits was flawed and it allowed, on a first come first serve basis, those with the most resources and money. We need to level the playing field and create more opportunities to expand this industry and regulate it safely.

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Joe Leventhal

No

NoNo. I don’t support cutting our police budget, period.

No

NoI support federal relief for those unemployed due to the COVID pandemic, including funding from programs such as the CARES Act. But I don’t think direct payments from local governments to landlords is a wise use of our already extremely stretched city budget.

Other

OtherCitations should be a last resort, not the first option. I think our local businesses have done a really good job of self enforcing mask wearing and other restrictions.

Other

OtherThis is not a city council issue.

Yes

YesI believe we should always look for improvements to our government institutions and organizations.

Yes

YesThis was already on the ballot in March 2020.

Other

OtherI support additional housing consistent with the community zoning and character.

Other

OtherI believe we should continue our safe parking lots program that provides specific locations for vehicle habitation, which should be limited and rare. We need to provide sufficient beds for our homeless population.

No

NoThe current limit is sufficient.

Photo of Marni von Wilpert

Marni von Wilpert

No

NoIn San Diego, long awaited police reforms are finally becoming reality, including banning chokeholds, independent oversight and new SDPD de-escalation policies. A robust reform agenda should also include more transparent reporting of use of force, early warning programs to identify troubled cops, and new hiring practices to recruit more diverse officers from the communities in which they serve. Immediate reforms for accountability, transparency and diversity are critical to restoring communities’ trust in police and ensuring every San Diegan is treated with the dignity and respect they deserve. Some have suggested ‘defunding police.’ But in my community, what I’ve heard is a desire to consider public safety holistically so our first responders are the right responders in situations that are more about personal crisis than crime. Cost is always a consideration, but it just seems like common sense for social workers and non-profits to lead homelessness outreach and the response to mental health calls, engaging law enforcement when needed. And I know San Diegans want to keep police ready to respond to the 17,000 domestic violence emergencies, 9,000 elder abuse cases, and nearly 1,000 rapes reported in our region every year. Budget decisions should reinforce reform, not lead them. I’m heartened that SDPD is developing new de-escalation policies and a renewed commitment to community-based policing. But none of that will be effective without ongoing training for our officers and keeping their compensation competitive. The reality is that some of the solutions may cost more, and we cannot close ourselves off to that possibility. Finally, America is confronting a national conversation about systemic racism that’s long overdue. And we all have a responsibility to turn this pain into meaningful change in our community — not only to reform policing practices, but to root out injustice everywhere we can.

Yes

YesThe economic devastation of the pandemic, in addition to the public health toll, has left many families and small businesses unable to pay their rent in San Diego due to no fault of their own. Many retailers, restaurants, theaters, gyms, and museums were forced to close to protect public health as COVID-19 cases rose. Enabling the most vulnerable to pay their rent and stay in their homes is critically important—rendering workers who lost their jobs due to COVID homeless is not going to solve any problems. It’s also important that landlords (many of whom are small businesses) are paid the rent that’s due. They too have financial obligations that need to be met. I support priority for rental assistance (as it currently is in San Diego) to be given to households with the most vulnerable members, such as minor children and senior citizens who are most vulnerable to the devastating health effects of COVID-19. An important thing to remember is small business owners are also protected by San Diego’s eviction moratorium, and they too need assistance with their commercial leases to keep their businesses running. As a City that is fueled by small business, we need to do all we can to help them through this crisis.

Other

OtherPublic health is everyone’s responsibility. The shutdowns and economic repercussions due to this pandemic have been difficult for everyone – especially our communities of color who are disproportionately affected. Business owners, employees, and parents are rightfully frustrated that their businesses can’t re-open or their children’s schools can’t open safely, because our federal administration has failed to contain this virus. When I served in the Peace Corps as a public health response volunteer in the height of the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa, the one thing that worked to help bend the curve of the spread of the virus was a consistent, science-based, public health message and leadership in government that everyone could get on board with. Public health requires that everyone who is out in public take precautions to care for one another. We need education first, and enforcement if necessary, of basic health orders to ensure we can get this virus under control and prevent illness and death. This will allow us to re-open our businesses, schools, and public spaces safely – without having to shut down again because we didn’t have the proper precautions in place.

No

NoThe postal service is one of the most important government services in our country. The postal service is a critical service that millions of people rely upon, providing a critical lifeline for rural communities and for delivery of medicines, paychecks and more. However, as a city councilwoman, I will not have jurisdiction over the US Postal Service, as it is a federal agency.

Yes

YesAs a Deputy City Attorney, I work at City Hall with our San Diego Police Officers every day, and I see the hard work they put into serving our community. I know that community policing is most effective when our police have the trust of the community behind them. San Diegans deserve to have trust in all aspects of their government. This proposal is a well-balanced, common sense solution that has been negotiated with the Police Officer’s Association, voted for unanimously by the City Council, and has the support of the community, the Mayor and the District Attorney. The community and City Hall came together to solve a problem, and I support both the proposal and the collaborative approach.

Yes

YesThe homelessness crisis cannot wait. We must act now to address it. But we cannot do so effectively without a dedicated stream of funding. Our communities also deserve pot holes filled, sidewalks fixed, and more parks and open space. All of these things, along with growing the economic engine that is the Convention Center, will be funded by tourism tax dollars—not San Diegans.

Other

OtherOur region is facing a housing crisis, and we must take action. I see firsthand how young families have trouble finding homes they can afford in San Diego. Our Seniors should also have the option to downsize or retire with dignity in their communities without being squeezed out of the housing market. We need a comprehensive approach to increase housing availability across income levels, including first-time homebuyer programs to help young families break into the market and reducing the cost of building housing, while balancing the need for smart growth, including maintaining community character, planning for traffic, schools, and wildfire safety. While we need to increase the housing inventory, my district has faced the devastating impact of wildfires in 2003 and again in 2007 – I do not want anyone to die in a wildfire because we didn’t plan well as a City.

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OtherSan Diego’s vehicle habitation ordinance is currently in active litigation, and as a Deputy City Attorney I feel it would be inappropriate to take a position on this issue while the City is in court. However, our City needs to accommodate the diverse needs of people experiencing homelessness at all levels and ensure our Safe Parking Programs meet the needs of those experiencing homelessness to get back on their feet and into housing again.

Other

OtherSince cannabis is now legal throughout the state of California, it is important that San Diego collects the important tax revenue from this growing lawful industry and ensures that good paying jobs are created by these local businesses. Regulation is important to ensure cannabis businesses are operating lawfully, and that cannabis businesses that cheat the law are not tolerated – especially at the expense of business owners who take care to comply with the rules. Of course, just like any planning decision, I would need to hear from stakeholders in law enforcement, healthcare, patients and businesses before taking a position on this issue.

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Will Moore

Other

OtherWe have made police bear the brunt of every social problem that we refuse to address directly. We ask our police to be mental health counselors. We ask them to be sexual trauma counselors. We ask them to cope with homelessness more directly than any other city agency. We ask them to be addiction treatment specialists. And, without admitting it to ourselves, we ask them to do our dirty work on race. It is not fair to ask this of the Police Department, and it is not fair to ask this of any officer. We should re-examine how we make San Diego the safest large city in America. There are, obviously, critical public safety functions for which police are the specialists. They respond to dangerous situations and solve crimes. These core functions should not be put at risk and any re-examination should keep that core function in mind. And the police department might be asked to evolve to more explicitly and methodically take on some of the social functions that they are now responsible for. But we have to figure out some way to direct our investments to recognize that $100 worth of mental health services can save us $10,000 in law enforcement costs. So yes, let’s fix our approach to policing, with urgency. But let’s not just lay this on the police. We need to look in the mirror — all of us. We need to be neighbors. We need to come together as a city and as a people — and grow into the future as one.

Yes

YesIn the wake of COVID and the city’s eviction moratorium, we currently have a severe balloon of unpaid rents that could put hundreds or thousands of people on the street at once, in the middle of a pandemic. We have a lot of hard working people in this town who lost their jobs or had their hours cut back because of the virus. This has affected not only tenants, but landlords who have done the right thing and worked with their impacted tenants to mitigate the economic impact of the virus. We should look to set ourselves up for success as we come out of the COVID crisis, and assisting with COVID-related rent debts is necessary to take care of San Diego and San Diegans.

No

NoI think we are too quick to make criminal sanctions the first line of response for people who are not acting the right way. If someone is severely endangering other people, yes, there are circumstances where that behavior merits citation or other law enforcement intervention. But I do not think it is wise to pass blanket rules that carry criminal citations without thinking very hard about how much that rule is likely to actually discourage behavior, versus how much that rule is likely to be unequally applied and used to burden some communities more than others.

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Yes

YesIn order to have effective law enforcement, we must have the confidence of all of our neighborhoods that the laws are being enforced for their benefit, rather than against them. Right now there are communities in this city where large groups of people do not feel that way. The charter amendment to create a new police review commission is a step in the right direction for helping us create that confidence.

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Photo of Joe LaCava

Joe LaCava

Other

OtherI support restructuring how we address public safety and social services. Currently, the City of San Diego relies on its police department (SDPD) to also address social issues—a job that officers are not trained for. I support returning SDPD to a community-oriented policing model that gets officers out of their patrol cars and walking their beat, connecting with residents and business owners. Only then are police seen as partners and guardians instead of enforcers. I support the County of San Diego stepping up to provide the social services through Health & Human Services by expanding Psychiatric Emergency Response Teams and the new Mobile Crisis Response Teams.

Yes

YesWe have always provided governmental assistance in times of national emergency to individuals, small businesses, and major corporations. We do this for the common good where the benefits exceed the costs. We must ensure that working families who lose employment because of the pandemic do not become homeless. We must also ensure that landlords do not lose their property to foreclosure. In exchange, we must be aggressive in reducing COVID19 outbreaks so we can begin the process of economic recovery.

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OtherVoluntary compliance of health orders by the general public has been successful in most instances, but in the case of chronic violators, enforcement is appropriate. Controlling COVID-19 outbreaks is the single most important challenge to our economic recovery and getting our children back in the classroom.

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OtherThis issue is well outside the jurisdiction of the San Diego City Council

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Photo of Stephen Whitburn

Stephen Whitburn

Yes

YesLaw enforcement agencies are designed to respond to emergencies and solve crimes. However, in recent years, they have been asked to conduct most of the outreach to people who are homeless. That outreach is best provided by social services agencies who are trained to connect people to housing.

Yes

YesThe federal government has distributed billions of dollars to cities to assist people who have lost jobs or been otherwise financially impacted by COVID-19. Using these funds to help people stay in their homes and prevent increased homelessness is an appropriate form of assistance.

Other

OtherYes, if violations are willful and endanger people's health. All of us have a responsibility to try to avoid spreading COVID-19. Those who endanger people's health by willfully violating public health orders should be cited. At the same time, we must recognize that the health orders have changed several times and have sometimes been unclear, so people who are inadvertently violating the orders should be informed rather than cited.

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OtherNo, not in the current form that has slowed the delivery of mail. We should not make significant changes to the Postal Service that slow down the delivery of mail including people's healthcare prescriptions and election ballots. That said, email communications and online shopping have changed the mix of mail delivered by the Postal Service, and it is reasonable to periodically review whether it is optimally organized to serve our needs.

Yes

YesYes, I have endorsed the ballot measure to create an independent commission. Complaints should be reviewed in a fair, independent manner that gives all parties and the broader community confidence in the integrity of the process.

Yes

YesDistrict 3 residents supported this proposal on the March primary ballot. It received 65% of the vote citywide. Officials are determining whether it needed a two-thirds vote to pass. In addition to the convention center, the measure provides $1.8 billion to reduce homelessness and $551 million to repair streets. These are funds generated from out-of-town guests staying in hotels. If officials determine it passed, the City Council must ensure these funds are used as intended.

Yes

YesCouncil District 3 can help address our housing crisis while involving neighborhood residents and protecting our environment. Adding housing Downtown gives people easy access to transit options. It is important that neighborhood residents be consulted and included at the beginning of discussions about new housing and building heights so that proposals reflect the benefit of the community’s input.

No

NoMany people living in vehicles are doing so out of necessity instead of sleeping on the sidewalks or in our canyons and parks. While the city’s safe parking lots for homeless people have helped, the lots are sometimes full and are impractical for some people to get to. The City should focus on ending large-scale homelessness, which is achievable under the framework adopted by the City Council last Fall.

Yes

YesDistrict 3 residents voted overwhelmingly to legalize cannabis, and it should be accessible. Currently, the District has fewer than four dispensaries, so it has not reached the existing limit.

Photo of Kelvin Barrios

Kelvin Barrios

Yes

YesCurrently, police officers are responding to an innumerable amount of non-criminal calls regarding substance abuse, mental health crises, our homeless population, etc. By the way the system has been structured over the years, this practice inherently prioritizes the enforcement of laws over providing support for our neighbors. Instead of dispatching police for all calls, we should be dispatching social workers and professionals that can actually address the underlying issues and provide long-term solutions. That is why I propose the following changes to build a community focused approach to public safety: - We must embrace community policing as a philosophy and not a strategy. We must allow our communities to reshape public safety and adopt a system that works for us and is driven by the needs of our community. - We must refrain from punitive enforcement of the law. We need a policy that requires Resisting and Reducing citations and enforcement of minor infractions. Encourage the use of warnings for minor infractions. - Implement specific guidelines and policies that are designed to de-escalate conflicts. - We need an independent community-led commission on police practices that serves and represents the needs of our residents. This commission must have Investigative powers with full access to any recordings, video, documentation, reports or evidence relevant to the incident. There must also be a well-defined process and procedure for recommendations based on findings with the power to make referrals to the City or District Attorney and recommendations for discipline, action or termination of employment. Board must maintain full transparency. - We need to reevaluate how our police academy does recruitment. We need to reevaluate all the requirements for applicants to ensure that the hiring process is equitable. There needs to be a concerted effort to increase recruitment of diverse and underrepresented groups and ensure that an applicant’s ability to work with a diverse community and cultural sensitivity is part of the selection criteria. We must also enact new requirements for law enforcement such as inherent bias workshops, cultural sensitivity and awareness, equity and diversity training and de-escalation tactics.

Yes

YesCOVID-19 has had a devastating impact on some of our most vulnerable communities. Communities of color have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. Some of the communities in District 9, like City Heights, have been completely ravaged by this public health crisis. The effects have been deeply felt within our communities and the impact hasn’t been just on our health but also economically. Many families in District 9 were already struggling well before the pandemic. This situation has simply put at the forefront many of the injustices and inequities many have lived with for decades. Our safety net has failed our communities. This failure is rooted in racist policies and underfunding of our communities that have put us at a disadvantage. As we begin to recover from this crisis, we need our government to ensure that our communities that are the most impacted receive the most help. This is why I want to be on the City Council to ensure that our recovery from this pandemic is focused on our communities and is done with equity at the forefront so that we can change the system that put us here in the first place. As part of our recovery, I propose that: - We increase access to rent relief. We need to invest more funds in ensuring that our most vulnerable community members do not lose their homes due to inability to pay the rent. We need a real commitment of at least $100 Million in rent relief to ensure folks don’t end up on the street and creating a worsening public health crisis. - We must address the environmental injustices plaguing our communities so that our children and families don’t have many of the underlying health conditions that have made us more susceptible to COVID-19, like diabetes due to lack of access to healthy and fresh food or asthma due to the bad air quality in our neighborhoods. - We need to tackle the housing crisis head on so that all our families and community members have a safe place to call home. Many in our communities have to share one roof with multiple families due to skyrocketing rents. Other families live in multi-generational homes due to lack of access to affordable housing. This has caused COVID-19 infection rates in our communities to increase dramatically due to the inability to quarantine or isolate and the close proximity of multiple family members living together. I will bring forward policies to eliminate red tape and increase our housing stock. - We must invest in small business relief to rescue many of the struggling small businesses in our community. Many of these businesses are owned by people of color from our community who have served as the backbone of our economy. We must allocate more funds to provide these businesses with economic relief to help them navigate these turbulent economic times. - We need to establish COVID-19 public resource centers throughout our City so that community members have access to information close to home and that is also culturally relevant. The city must also leverage our local nonprofits and CBO’s to do effective outreach to diverse communities to ensure our residents have access to the resources that they need.

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OtherI do not agree with adding mask enforcement of individuals on the street to our police's purview. I'd rather invest in a robust education program, in as many languages as possible to reach every District 9 resident. Businesses that disregard public health orders should be cited appropriately.

No

NoPartisan politics needs to stay out of this federal service that the whole country depends upon. Jobs need to be protected and the USPS should not be an entity that is politicized. I stand with the letter carriers union who do not support a realignment or reorganization and instead have called on us to focus on the real source of the Postal Service’s financial crisis - the mandate to prefund retiree health benefits decades in advance, which accounts for 92% of the agency’s reported losses since 2007.

Yes

YesWe have all read their names and listened to their stories – the countless lives lost due to the systemic racism our country was built on. We search for answers, but the reality is that our institutions were fundamentally built to put people of color at a disadvantage. So many lives have been cut short because of a crack in the system that is supposed to protect us. We must do better. We need a new police review commission, with subpoena power, and we need the right people to sit on that commission. If elected, I'll be very involved in the search for candidates to sit on the committee.

Yes

YesI did support Measure C when it was on the ballot. Our City is facing a homelessness crisis and we need immediate action. This crisis is not only affecting those that are on our streets, but it’s also affecting our community as a whole. Not that long ago we saw how our City faced a hepatitis outbreak due to a lack of action by our leaders in helping creating a safer environment for those on our streets. Yearly, our communities in District 9 face fire dangers from homeless encampments on the edges of our communities. We can no longer sit back and hope this issue goes away, our communities and our safety are at stake. As a Volunteer Community Organizer for Homelessness youth outreach, I worked on the ground to provide much needed resources to youth experiencing homelessness. All San Diegans deserve to have access to housing and with my experience and connection to our communities, I have the tools to bring forward real solutions to fix our homelessness problem.

Yes

YesSan Diego and our communities are facing a housing crisis. The long-time residents that have made our District 9 communities vibrant and special are now being priced out of their own homes. The rent is too high and too many of our working families cannot afford to live in the communities they grew up in. Unfortunately many of our community members are being pushed to the margins of our city, further increasing their commute times, moving away from families and friends and disrupting their quality of life. Our community needs more housing, but we need to build the kind of housing that fits the needs of our communities. As a former Community Planning Board member and Town Council Vice-President I know how important it is for residents to be heard. As a Council Policy Advisor I worked with regional leaders to ensure we are setting aggressive measures and benchmarks to build more units and increase access to home ownership for our residents. As an advocate for our working families, I worked directly with people that aim to create jobs and increase affordable housing. As your Councilmember, I will produce results for our community. When elected, I will propose a housing action plan that will reflect the values and needs of our District 9 residents.

No

NoWe can't add additional burdens to families that are already struggling. Rather than heap fines on people that already can't afford them, we need more safe overnight parking facilities and housing for people that need it.

Yes

YesWe must first address the current issues affecting the cannabis industry and take a second look at our ordinances to ensure that we're not only protecting the cannabis businesses but our residents as well, with regulated access. I believe we must increase access and increase the caps but not before identifying what's working right now and what's not working under the current framework.

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Sean Elo-Rivera

Yes

YesI believe we should redirect funding so police are no longer tasked with jobs that should have never been in their purview — dealing with drug addiction and responding to mental health crises and homelessness, to name a few.In many cases, this is work that even police officers often say should be taken off their overloaded plates. In doing so, we will be able to invest in community members with the specialized training and experience to handle these delicate situations. Perhaps even more importantly, diverting money toward programs, services and resources will mean more opportunity and a safer world for all.Safety is universally desired, but it is defined very differently based on an individual’s background and experiences. Safety is having a home to sleep in and food to eat. It is having health care and a well-lit neighborhood with decent sidewalks and streets. Safety is a job that pays well enough to cover the bills, and the ability to secure a loan to start or save a business. Safety is living in a neighborhood with quality schools and after-school programs that make hope and opportunity abundant. And, yes, safety is also having someone to call who is able and willing to put their life on the line if a dangerous situation arises. Perhaps most importantly, safety is knowing that systems, institutions and those with power see, recognize and honor your humanity.The responsibility to be the sole source of safety should have never been placed on police. Safety is a societal responsibility.

Yes

YesEvictions must be avoided at all costs -- especially during a pandemic. Always a bad situation for all parties involved, the notion of allowing more San Diegans to end up homelessness is unacceptable. Emergency rental assistance is an effective way to mitigate evictions while ensuring property owners receive the income they need to avoid foreclosure. 

Other

OtherIt depends on the violation. While recognizing the economic and social impacts of COVID-19 and acknowledging my own desire to see things return to normal, it is important that individuals and groups follow health orders. That being said, health orders cannot become a pretext for unnecessary interactions between law enforcement and the public. Citations should be given  judiciously. 

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Raul Campillo

Other

OtherAs a prosecutor, I know firsthand that it's not the amount of money, but the way in which the money is spent, that is what we need to address--and we need increased social services to preemptively reduce the causes of crime. There are other mechanisms to improve the security and well-being of our community: stronger public education, mental health care and economic progress in every neighborhood, not just wealthy ones. Some of these are paid through the city’s general fund, and others are not. When it comes to the police budget, let’s redirect parts of the SDPD budget to provide continual training on unconscious bias and de-escalation to reduce violent conflict. Let’s expand proactive, de-centralized community policing. And let's put more funding in areas like preventing domestic violence and human trafficking. Many parts of the police budget that would alleviate the suffering of victims are actually underfunded, so let’s take the money we spend on policing homelessness and drugs and redirect it to what police are good at and which have very serious impacts on victims.

Yes

YesYes: we need to have offsets for people who lost their job or had reduction in wages due to COVID. We must not let our federal government's failure to keep the pandemic from spreading be the reason people lose their homes.

Yes

YesJust like a person with tuberculosis not staying quarantined is a violation of the county code, we should cite individuals (not punitively, but with infractions like speeding tickets) who violate other health orders. This has never been a controversial issue or stance with other types of infectious, communicable disease, and it should not be with COVID.

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OtherThis would depend on if it would protect the USPS workers' jobs and if it would truly make the delivery of mail more efficient.

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YesI am voting yes on this charter amendment. It is an important step to rebuilding trust with all communities and law enforcement. I believe that significant community trust will begin to be restored with the review commission; however, I do believe that clarity on the details of the budget of the commission and the eventual enabling ordinance are critical to the success of the commission and those details are still in the process of being worked out.

Yes

YesThis was a question from the Primary Election, so its not relevant to the General Election, but yes, I did vote in support of this initiative. Measure C would have provided key funding for multiple long-term issues facing our city. Further, the Convention Center is a publicly owned building, so the additional use of the Convention Center into the future will lead to more revenue coming right back to the City. Additionally, the workers building the expanded center would have been our very own construction and building workers, further supporting our local economy and working families. While there was some criticism of the measure for lacking specificity as to where the money for homeless services will be allocated, it would have been up to the City Council and future mayors to make sure that the will of the voters was realized.

Other

OtherDistrict 7 is unique in that it has Mission Valley, which is ripe for density and taller buildings as it lies on a core transit line (Green Line Trolley), and District 7 has multiple major transportation hubs (Fashion Valley and Grantville). However, given the state of traffic and crumbling infrastructure on multiple freeway entrances (Mission Gorge Rd., Waring Rd., and College Ave.) and the distance from jobs for several neighborhoods (Tierrasanta and San Carlos), we need to assess the appropriateness for housing density and height limits on a community-by-community basis. Working with town councils and planning groups will help us making these decisions. Fundamentally, increasing housing density is key to solving the housing crisis and must be implemented when possible.

Other

OtherThe Vehicle Habitation Ordinance does not achieve the goal it was intended to solve. As a prosecutor in the San Diego City Attorney's Office, I know that the current California penal code and the San Diego Municipal Code prohibit the conduct that residents have concerns about regarding individuals residing in their vehicles in their neighborhoods. These laws should be enforced, instead of having individuals ticketed for sleeping in their cars. The City should do more to provide resources to those in the unfortunate circumstance of living in their cars, so that these individuals do not end up parking in residential areas, far from services.

Other

OtherThis is a complex issue that involves commerce, taxation, zoning, infrastructure, and public health. I want to bring together the town councils, other community groups, school leaders, health organizations, and various business associations to explore if, when, and where it would be appropriate to raise the cap on cannabis dispensaries.

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Terra Lawson-Remer

Other

OtherI support increasing funding to social services, especially targeting our enrollment outreach so that we can get vulnerable San Diegans into programs they need that are paid for by the state or federal government. I also want to create a new program to dispatch trained mental health professionals to non-violent emergency calls, so that folks who need help can get it while our police are better able to focus on doing the job they trained for.

Yes

YesI absolutely support efforts to help our local families and small businesses get rent relief from the state or (more likely) federal government. The scale of need is too great for the County to bear alone, but any state or federal aid program will likely run through the County for implementation and disbursement, and I will fight to make sure our communities get their share of help for rent and other COVID-related costs.

Yes

YesYes. We cannot defeat this virus if people do not follow the public health orders. I stand with experts, and support enforcement of the rules they have issued to try and protect our health. That’s the only way we can get our economy back on track- nobody will be rushing back to boost consumer spending if they’re afraid of another wave of this pandemic.

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OtherCertainly not in the way that Trump's postmaster Louis DeJoy is “realigning” it. This issue is far beyond the scope of the County, but I support efforts to keep the Postal Service fast, reliable, affordable, and accessible.

Yes

YesI support the SoS initiative. Although it has some shortcomings, on balance this is what our County needs right now. Urban sprawl is one of the biggest challenges we face in San Diego County. Sprawl is generating our increasing traffic and congestion, with people driving incredibly long distances to commute from home to work. Sprawl development is also driving carbon emissions and climate change, because 40% of carbon emissions in San Diego come from cars idling in traffic. And sprawl is responsible for paving over our precious open spaces, some of the most biodiverse regions in the world. So we need to put a stop to sprawl. The SoS initiative aims to do just that, by stopping the current practice of developers buying cheap farmland, and then asking the Board of Supervisors for yet another General Plan Amendment -- creating profits just through a sweetheart deal to upzone the land. Unfortunately, this has become business as usual, so I do believe it makes sense to have the SOS initiative, because we have to reset expectations. We have a General Plan, which was developed through an intense consultative community process, and while it is by no means perfect, it does aim to channel development into denser areas, infill areas near transit centers, and reduce or eliminate sprawl growth. I think about this as an economist thinks about things. There’s something called game theory: you think about if you make a move, how does the next person make a move? And so we need to make a move on the County level to change the set of expectations that developers have. Because right now developers have a set of expectations that if you go and you buy farmland on the cheap and you put in the time and the resources to develop a proposal, you can then take it to the county board and lobby for a general plan amendment and get it up-zoned. We’ve created that set of expectations. We need to realign those expectations, so developers know that they’re not going to get an amendment, so they shouldn’t go buy that cheap farmland. Instead, developers should be looking to develop in areas already been zoned for housing. And we at the County should facilitate this process, by making it less expensive to build in the right places, where we need housing. We absolutely need homes in San Diego, but we need to make changes about where it’s going to be profitable to build. Because if I’m a developer, I’m going to decide where to build based on where I can have a reasonable rate of return because that’s reasonable. We need to change that set of expectations so that we can incentivize folks to be building the places we need to be building, and not the places we don’t. So I do support SoS, but I hope that in the future we can establish that the Board will exercise better judgment without requiring the voters’ input on every amendment. In general I disagree with making land-use decisions at the ballot box. Fundamentally, the job of the Board of Supervisors is to take the time to explore each potential amendment carefully and with the benefit of careful staff analysis before making a decision, and I don’t think that it’s fair or reasonable to ask voters to match that level of analysis on every issue.

Yes

YesYes, absolutely. We have an affordable housing crisis. And when I talk about affordable housing, I mean housing for average, middle class San Diegans. The vast majority of the homes we are building are for households at 120% or 150% or more of median income. All the rest of us are left out to dry. It’s expensive to build housing here because all of the inputs -- land, labor, and capital -- are expensive. So we cannot expect affordable housing to magically materialize without County leadership. We need to tackle this crisis in multiple ways. I would charter a local public bank, recently allowed under state law, to focus on affordable housing. This would not only allow us to spur construction of more affordable housing, but would also mean that in developments where the County fronts much of the cost, we can require the best environmental standards. In the areas of the County already zoned for density, near work centers, we need to make it more efficient for environmental, affordable housing construction to get approved, and not be bogged down with lengthy approvals that exponentially increase costs. This is an area where we need bold, innovative County leadership.

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YesYes, absolutely. We face a climate crisis. This is an existential crisis. Whether we leave a planet for future generations to inherit depends on us taking bold, determined action today. San Diego County’s Climate Action Plan has been found legally deficient twice, because it’s not even good enough to meet the minimum California State standards. We’ve paid-out over a million dollars defending the County from these lawsuits instead of taking action. I will fight for a Climate Action Plan that is bold and innovative – and that can serve as a national model for how we can address the climate crisis. Key components of my Climate Action Plan include: adopting a Community Choice Aggregation Program, to achieve 90% clean energy by 2030; ending the off-shoring of carbon offsets -- when developers are required to reduce GHG emissions to net zero with habitat restoration or other projects, that needs to happen here in our community, where we can all benefit and where the offsets can be enforced in perpetuity, not in the Congo or Sri Lanka; converting our fleet of county vehicles, including sheriff squad cars, fire trucks, and other emergency vehicles, to electric or hybrid; retrofitting all county buildings to run on solar power, and to meet the highest LEED energy efficiency standards; ending the conversion of farmland and chaparral and other carbon sinks by stopping urban sprawl through a moratorium on amendments to the county General Plan; extending mass transit throughout the County, and building more protected lanes for bikes and scooters, so we cut the number of cars on the roads in half by 2035; establishing a new “Mitigation Bank”, which developers finance as a mean to make any new construction project carbon neutral-- funding things like electrification of the Port of San Diego, habitat restoration for critical carbon sinks, and subsidies for homes and businesses to weatherize buildings, install solar, and build to LEED standards; mandating solar energy, water reclamation and ecologically appropriate landscaping in all new construction – both commercial and residential.

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YesOur ongoing rash of jail deaths was truly heartbreaking before COVID-19 began sweeping through jails and magnifying the tragedies many times over. Even before the pandemic, we had roughly a dozen people die in jail every year -- none of whom should, and many of whom have not even been convicted of a crime. In our judicial system we believe that you are innocent until you’re proven guilty, but then in San Diego we are locking people up and they are dying in custody. I really like the CAHOOTS model in Oregon, where instead of sending just law enforcement officials out when you have a 911 call, you send a crisis emergency team.

Other

OtherWe need to repair our roads, invest in public transit, and build communities closer to where people live and work. We need a transportation system in San Diego to match the County we’ve become, which is the 8th largest metropolitan region in the country. And we need a transit solution built with an eye to the future, to nudge us towards growing into the region we want to become -- a region with downtowns and urban cores and sleepy beach communities and farms and forests and deserts. This means different transit solutions in different parts of the county, transit options that make sense for each community. In some parts of our county we have the density, or are moving towards having the density, where mass public transit really makes sense. This could mean trains, light rail, trolley expansions, etc.. In other parts of the County, like Tierrasanta, the right public transit solution might utilize existing roads with very frequent mini-vans serving as rapid buses. And in some parts of our county, the semi-rural parts, and the communities with low density, cars are the only practical solution to get from home to work. We have an incredibly diverse county, from farmland to beach communities to urban downtowns to suburban areas to vast swaths of protected forests and deserts. So there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Wherever feasible, I support much greater investments in sustainable transit options. We also need to repair and invest in our roads. Increasing transit investments in the right places, along major transit corridors, connecting centers of work with residential neighborhoods, would benefit everyone -- especially people who stay in their cars. Our traffic is created by the last 10% of cars that enter our roadways, so if we can get just 10% of cars off the road, that hugely benefits the other 90% of drivers. So overall I like many aspects of the SANDAG proposals, but there are not enough details, and I think we need to prioritize locally tailored solutions that work for each community— and that means a diversity of approaches across our diverse county. My training as a researcher makes me want to look at the data and form good policy based on the data. We need to do the feasibility studies to figure out what makes sense for San Diego before spending hundreds of millions or maybe billions of dollars on investments without real hard analysis about how that’s going to stack up. I think we’re doing the right thing by funding the studies and that’s the step they took. We have to think about how we’re going to realign our housing policy too, to match and to mesh with transit policy. We cannot just think about transit policy in a vacuum. You have to think about how these things go together.

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Nora Vargas

Other

OtherI am proposing a Family's First Initiative for the County of San Diego that includes mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 and working towards an inclusive and vibrant economic recovery. My focus is to fund crucial resources such as public health, housing assistance for seniors and homeless families, youth services, and comprehensive mental health services. As such, and within this Family's First framework, I believe the County of San Diego has an opportunity to lead the way to improve public safety practices in a holistic manner. Law enforcement is tasked with the safety of our communities, they should not be everyone’s first call when there’s a non-criminal case, healthcare crisis, or responsibilities that are out of their purview. I propose we fully fund our HOT teams and PERT teams and our mobile crisis response teams. Give them the authority to make critical decisions on issues that are health and mental health-related, because they are adequately trained to tackle these issues and can ensure these situations are not escalated. We should explore decriminalizing drug offenses that are really mental healthcare issues. We can redirect funding to our health and human services department to create an integrated system of care that can lead to better health outcomes for patients, safer facilities, and also help reduce recidivism in our County Jails. Building relationships with community matters. We have an opportunity to take a new approach that would help build trust in our communities. As your next supervisor, I am committed to reassessing our budget priorities and aligning them to address the needs of our communities using data and evidence to identify problems and look for solutions.

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YesIn South County, we have high concentrations of renters - National City and Imperial Beach alone have over 60% renters in their cities. And many of those renters are paying over 50% of their income towards rent. This pandemic has magnified the disparities our working families face and many are currently suffering from the threats of being displaced. While many of our landlords are unable to meet their obligations as a result of their tenants not being able to pay rent, our County has the opportunity to invest in providing programs that support tenants and infrastructure to educate tenants and landlords. As a Supervisor, I want to make sure we secure local, state, or federal funds to create forgiveness grants or programs, especially for individuals and families who have remained in their homes due to the eviction moratoriums. Now, families are concerned about the amount of debt accumulated that they will not be able to pay and this can result in their displacement. I have been on the frontlines connecting people to much-needed resources, including financial assistance, housing counseling, connecting them to nonprofit organizations that are dedicated to that work. As County Supervisor, I am committed to making sure that we help families stay in their homes, ensure they’re connected to social service programs, and that we create pathways to housing security and homeownership.

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OtherThe health and well-being of the public must be a priority. The County enforcement teams must work with our local cities to ensure we prioritize compliance, it should not be criminalized. The purpose of the public health care order is to do everything in our power to stop the spread of the virus so that ultimately our communities can reintegrate into society and our economy can recover and thrive.

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NoIn the case of the United States Postal Service, a government function that is explicitly authorized under the Constitution of the United States of America, we must agree as a nation, regardless of political party affiliation, that it must continue to offer the important services it delivers today. Families receive their prescription medicine, send packages to military family members serving overseas, veterans receive their benefits, seniors and disabled people receive their monthly benefits, and many of us receive parcels and other mail including grocery specials and coupons. I support any improvement or innovation that supports the continued function of the USPS. I reject efforts to harm the USPS including the laws that are intended to privatize the USPS. This fall, most of us in San Diego County will vote by mail because of COVID 19. We all have an expectation the mail is both secure, but that it will be post-dated on the day it is mailed and that it will arrive within a couple of days to the County Registrar of Voters to be counted. Regrettably, we have all seen news reports about the efforts under the Trump Administration to reduce the USPS mission and service. I believe in the role of government in our lives and the importance of our US Postal Service.

Other

OtherI support the premise of the initiative but I am not in support of ballot-box planning. As an advocate for healthcare for years I have seen the negative impact that these have had, particularly in communities of color. A clear example of how these initiatives can impact our communities was the proposed Barrio Logan community plan. It had been approved by residents and stakeholders, yet voters in La Jolla and in the Northern part of the City of San Diego ended up deciding what happened in Barrio Logan and I don't think that's fair. Unfortunately, we know that what happens with these initiatives is that special interests with resources get to persuade voters that ultimately make decisions in communities that they have never stepped foot in. To be clear, I am not in support of sprawl development or building in wildfire high-risk areas. I will be a champion and an advocate to protect open spaces and build housing near public transit and job centers on the Board of Supervisors.

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YesYes, I fundamentally believe that everyone has the right to shelter and currently, we are living through a housing crisis that is being exacerbated by COVID-19. As a County we have an opportunity to​ increase the supply of affordable and workforce housing​ to meet the ever growing demands. We need to take the lead in addressing the housing shortage and skyrocketing rental prices that have plagued our communities for decades. To address the housing crisis we need to preserve, protect and produce affordable housing stock for young people, working families, veterans, and seniors on fixed incomes. We must invest additional resources to assist with services such as tenant counseling and first time home buyer education programs that can help transition our renter community into home owners, helping them have a part of the American dream.

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YesIt is the County’s responsibility to ensure that we are doing everything we can to stop the climate crisis. As Supervisor, I am committed to championing a legally binding Climate Action Plan that would get us to zero emissions by 2035 along with adequate funding for its implementation. I am also committed to championing a CAP that prioritizes real solutions to the systemic racial inequities impacting our communities. The CAP needs to be more aggressive and the county should be leading the region’s efforts. The reality is that we have some big issues to address, especially around environmental injustices that have impacted our D1 communities for decades. This has resulted in communities such as Barrio Logan, Logan Heights, National City, having the highest incidences of asthma, due to poor air quality. Then we also have the southern communities of our district such as San Ysidro who have been impacted by poor air quality as a result of increased traffic at the border. As Supervisor I will address our Environmental Justice needs by focusing on the following in my first 100 days: I am committed to championing a Climate Action Plan, while prioritizing the systemic racial inequities impacting our communities. CAPs are crucial for governments to work towards a plan to move to clean energy. Decarbonization is key to prevent future natural disasters. Our County has failed to deliver a plan to meet our strong state climate goals which is why the county’s plan has lost at the battle of the courts. I will ensure as Supervisor that any plan approved will meet the needs to address the climate goals. I will push for Healthy and Environmental Justice elements to be added to the General Plan. In 2016, SB 1000 was adopted and called for every municipal local government to adopt these elements in their general plan, with National City being an inspiration for this law; it is saddening to see that our county still lacks this environmental justice element. I am proud that my campaign is endorsed by San Diego's first and oldest environmental justice organization in the San Diego region, the Environmental Health and Justice Campaign, as well as the Sierra Club, Climate Defenders Action Fund and League of Conservation Voters.

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YesYes, and as a County supervisor I will fight for accountability and transparency in our County jails. Sheriff Gore has a responsibility to the public and must address this crisis with the urgency it warrants. Our county jails have the highest inmate death rate among large counties in the state. There is no reason why anybody should be dying in our jails. I will advocate to move away from our jails serving as mental healthcare facilities and instead invest in prevention and mental healthcare facilities where we focus on diagnoses and care. I most recently opposed the Sheriffs proposal to privatize medical and behavioral health services in San Diego County detention facilities. The outsourcing of critical healthcare jobs not only threatened hundreds of County nurses and social workers with layoffs, but it’s putting lives, safety, and transparency at risk. There are too many cases where outside contractors are doing the work that county employees could be doing. We need to stop outsourcing, especially to contractors who don’t have the skills, institutional knowledge or experience. What we are trying to address is how do we improve healthcare outcomes in our county jails, and how do we do it cost effectively. I believe our trained healthcare professionals can do the job. That is why I support the recommendation to create an integrated system of care that can lead to better health outcomes for patients, safer facilities, and also help reduce recidivism as well as moving responsibility for inmate health care over to Health & Human Services.The pandemic has exacerbated many of the existing mental health cases in our region. As your next Supervisor, I am committed to moving away from our jails serving as mental healthcare facilities. As a former healthcare executive I bring a unique skill set to the Board of Supervisors and I am proud to have the support of leading healthcare organizations such as the California Nurses Association/National Nurses Organizing Committee, National Union of Healthcare Workers, and Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

Yes

YesAs the next Supervisor, advancing mobility choices is a priority for me! I represent transit-dependent communities that have been underinvested in their transportation needs for decades and our communities have been calling for these investments for many years. I believe it’s time for our region to have a world-class transportation system that is reliable, accessible and affordable while embracing the innovations of transportation technology and that includes public transit, walking, and biking. My role as Supervisor will be to ensure we account for the needs of South County communities and that they’re not left behind because of technology or because of the innovative systems we put in place. We need to make sure we make equitable investments moving forward. Transportation is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, which impacts communities in San Diego’s urban core most severely. I think SANDAG is heading in the right direction and I support SANDAG’s “5 Big Moves” Plan. If we want to reduce carbon emissions to zero by 2035, San Diego needs to reevaluate how we get around because we are growing as a county and we need to invest in options for our communities. SANDAG’s “5 Big Moves” Plan will enhance connectivity, increase safety and sustainability, and improve quality of life. If we are going to solve the climate crisis, we must embrace public transit. A world-class system will encourage ridership across the region.

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Steve Vaus

No

NoNo, I do not support defunding the police. Anything that will weaken or diminish the ability of deputy sheriffs or police officers to respond to criminal or hazardous incidents is unacceptable to me. Public safety is a core responsibility of government. I am proud that Poway is considered the safest city in the county. It reflects well on the partnership we have built with San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. However, there are clearly some responsibilities that have been shifted to law enforcement over the years that may be better handled by clinical social workers and psychologists. There are, no doubt, many mental health calls that need responders with training in psychological and substance abuse issues. As Supervisor, I would support expanding the staff of trained social service providers available to respond to mental health crisis calls.

Yes

YesGiven the severity of the pandemic, it makes sense to implement a short-term program that provides rental assistance. This program should be funded by the State of California. Additionally, I favor a program that would provide economic assistance to landlords that have been impacted by the government-imposed rent payment moratoriums. This program, as with the rental assistance support, is clearly a responsibility of the state government. A significant additional problem in California is the exceedingly poor way the state unemployment system is run and administered. This week, the Employment Development Department announced that it is suspending all new applications for two weeks, in order to solve a large number of technical problems. It is shocking to me that after nearly seven months of this pandemic, with the massive unemployment it has caused, that the State of California is unable to process basic applications for the unemployed. The Sacramento politicians are seemingly uninterested in the plight of our unemployed. Fixing the EDD should be their first priority.

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NoCitations strike me as an unnecessarily heavy-handed way to address a public health issue. I favor education and persuasion for instances when a business or individual does not comply with public orders. I’d acknowledge that there may be extreme cases where stronger measures are needed, but I don’t believe that we have reached that point yet.

Yes

YesYes. The USPS needs to pay for itself, thus it needs to be run as a business would run. Building a better and more efficient postal service is no simple task, but regular mail delivery remains an essential element of American business and social life.

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Kristin Gaspar

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OtherI do not support so-called “defund the police efforts”; however, I have been a strong advocate for juvenile justice reform and mental health services in addition to working with the formerly incarcerated on real rehabilitation services. During my first term I have been proud to partner with law enforcement to bring Achievement Centers to assist juvenile offenders, worked with Palomar Health on a state-of-the-art Behavioral Health Center, and the Sheriff and Public Defender to make The Other Side Academy a reality in San Diego to assist formerly incarcerated individuals with reintegration into society.

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OtherAs both a tenant and property owner I am empathetic to the needs of our community as a result of this unprecedented pandemic and have supported both temporary eviction moratoriums and rental assistance proposals. I do believe we need to have reasonable limitations on the mount of money and length of time.

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OtherI believe egregious and chronic violators should be cited. I also believe that throughout this pandemic our community has rallied around best practices and made tremendous sacrifices. I do not believe every violation should be cited as the vast majority of people are doing their best to comply.

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OtherThe USPS is an institution, but it is also a federal matter.

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Ben Hueso

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Joel Anderson

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Mike Levin

No

NoI do not believe that police should be defunded. However, I do support significant reforms to law enforcement, including an end to the militarization of local police departments. I also support more funding for community policing programs to improve relations between law enforcement and communities of color, as well as funding to help diversify police departments. I also support more funding for public schools, social services, and programs to lift up underserved communities.

Yes

YesMillions of Americans are facing evictions and homelessness as a result of this pandemic. It is imperative that local, state, and federal governments provide rental assistance for those most in need to keep families off the streets. I voted to provide more than $100 billion in rental assistance for families across the country who are struggling as a result of the pandemic. I continue to believe that is desperately needed.

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OtherLocal law enforcement should decide how and when to enforce public health orders. Our top priority should be keeping people healthy and safe, and that means that everyone needs to follow the public health orders. If people repeatedly put others’ health and safety at risk by violating those public health orders, then they should be held accountable.

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NoThe United States Postal Service is essential for millions of Americans who depend on the agency to deliver medications, paychecks, ballots, and more. Just like other federal agencies, the USPS exists to serve taxpayers, not to turn a profit. That being said, there are things we can do to strengthen the Postal Service and improve its financial stability. First and foremost, we need to provide $25 billion in emergency grants for the USPS. This is the same level of funding that the USPS Board of Governors -- which is entirely made up of Trump appointees – recommend to keep the agency’s doors open. Our top priority must be protecting the USPS and ensuring it continues to provide high-quality services to the American people. Then we should consider long-term ideas to increase its revenue.

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Georgette Gomez

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YesWe need to completely reprioritize the way we are directing policing investments in disadvantaged communities. As San Diego City Council President I have already ensured we began that transformation with actions such as shifting mandates for homeless outreach away from the police, and putting it in the hands of social workers. The federal government should be directing funding towards programs such as these, which deal with systematic inequalities and truly keep all of our communities safe.

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YesI am a strong advocate for affordable housing and rent assistance. As City Council President I have supported rent relief and aid for both landlords and tenants. The federal government needs to provide rental relief as we emerge from the depths of this pandemic, as well as a myriad of other relief programs to ensure both renters and landlords are protected.

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YesWe all need to listen to public health officials and make sure that we follow public health rules and regulations. They are there to protect us and especially in the midst of a global pandemic we need to enforce public health orders for safety and prosperity. I am supportive of citing individuals who flagrantly disregard public health orders, especially when putting others at risk.

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YesWe need to ensure that the US Postal Service is protected and preserved. I support realignment efforts that will ensure the USPS will continue to protect and promote democracy and make sure that individuals who rely on the postal service for business and health will receive their products in a timely fashion.

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YesI believe we should cancel all student loans for low to income classes. There are over 40 million Americans with student loan debt and especially in time of economic crisis it is of paramount importance to remove that economic burden.

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YesIt is absolutely necessary for us to have stricter gun control laws. We should ban assault rifles and have comprehensive background checks, including mental health screenings.

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YesAs a longtime environmental activist, I have spent decades trying to redirect the ways that we are growing our infrastructure and our economy. The Green New Deal is an excellent framework for the work that needs to be done to exacerbate the climate crisis.

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Scott Peters

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OtherPolice officers are being asked to do a lot of things they are neither trained nor qualified to do – responsibilities that currently fall within police department budgets, and probably shouldn’t. Police officers are not social workers. They are not public health professionals. They are law enforcement officers. Homeless outreach, social work and other public health services and their associated funding should be moved to other government agencies. I do not support eliminating or defunding the police; they play a critical role in keeping us safe. If someone is breaking into your home in the middle of the night, or if you hear violence being threatened against a neighbor, you don’t want to call a social worker, you want to call the cops; you want the cops to respond in a way that treats everyone equally, fairly and justly.

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YesI voted for the HEROES Act in May which provided $1 billion in emergency rental assistance funds that can be provided to lower income households that are unable to afford their rent and utilities, up to households with incomes as high as 120% of the Area Median Income. State and local governments can use the funds to provide short- and medium-term rental assistance for up to 24 months, or to cover up to 6 months of back rent and late fees. Rental assistance payments are made directly to the housing provider on behalf of the tenant. The Republican-controlled Senate has thus far refused to act on this legislation.

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YesPeople who flagrantly and repeatedly violate public health orders designed to keep people healthy and to keep infection rates low so businesses can stay open should be held accountable.

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NoIt is the Constitutional right of every American to receive mail; the U.S. Post Office is the only mail delivery service that delivers to every corner of the country, no matter how remote. As with every federal agency, there is always room for improvement. However, I do not support privatizing the U.S. Postal Service.

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OtherLocal law enforcement have always and should continue to cooperate with federal law enforcement where the agencies have interests in common, as with protecting national security or stopping violent criminals for example. However, is not the responsibility of local law enforcement to enforce federal immigration laws. Federal funding for state and local governments should not be contingent on local law enforcement support of ICE activities.

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OtherThe federal government should do more to make post-secondary education affordable for students. Education — university, community college, career and technical — is key to making our economy strong. I passed a law with Democrats and Republicans to cut student loan interest rates, and introduced another to reduce rates further because it’s wrong for the federal government to make profits on students and their families. I also have a plan to give tax incentives to employers to help their workers pay down their student debt. I will keep fighting to make college more affordable while working to invest more in science, engineering, biotechnology, and research at San Diego’s universities that create the jobs of the future.

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NoI support strengthening and improving the Affordable Care Act to help move toward universal coverage. Standing up to Republican sabotage of the Affordable Care Act is critical if we are to ensure that we have a lasting, viable healthcare system for Americans. People who like their health insurance should be allowed to keep it. I also support creating a public option, one in which, for example, people could buy into Medicare.

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YesI came to Congress shortly after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, determined to make a difference and prevent the next gun violence tragedy. After years of Republican inaction on gun violence, I joined my Democratic colleagues in passing legislation to require background checks for all gun purchases. While California has some of the nation’s strongest gun laws, there is more we can do to keep communities safe throughout the country, and I am committed to insisting on further action to address gun violence including funding for CDC research into gun violence, reinstating an assault weapon ban, banning high-capacity magazine, and enhanced funding for mental health programs.

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OtherI support the climate provisions of the Green New Deal, but its plans to radically remake the economy would divide the country and actually slow down our response to the climate crisis, one of the greatest global challenges of our time. As a climate leader in Congress, I am acutely aware of how urgently we need to act to stave off the worst effects of our changing climate. To make a difference now, Congress should focus on what we can pass today. That’s why I have created The Climate Playbook, which includes hundreds of pieces of bipartisan legislation that would make a difference and are achievable now.

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Brian Maryott

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NoAbsolutely not, and acting like these two things are mutually exclusive is disingenuous. We should always be updating and refining policing tactics and equipment, and strive to minimize violent incidents. However, diverting money from police departments will work counter to the intended goal. The most critical factors for good policing involve recruiting the right candidates, initial and ongoing training, and holding officers accountable to the guidelines and policy. Reducing funding for our law enforcement agencies will not help a single one of those areas – and it will most certainly not make our communities safer.

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OtherIn times of crisis, nothing is off the table. Philosophically however, we have to be very judicious about any decisions that involve borrowing still more money from future generations. Every dollar we borrow impacts our already strained balance sheet - and there will be various consequences, including higher interest rates, that our children will deal with for decades. Some members of Congress have either forgotten this, don’t realize it, or they are unconcerned. We have to be smart and pragmatic. COVID is real and it has caused us to rethink everything about our everyday life – however it is clearly not the Spanish flu, and this is 2020 not 1919. We are handling this virus pretty well. At some point, we have to move cautiously forward and return to functional normalcy.

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OtherI think the more we escalate the emotions around this health crisis, the longer it is going to take to heal our community. Business owners are losing everything, parents are irate that their children can’t be in school, and everyone is feeling the broader impact of this public health scare. Citing individuals for varying their behavior seems unproductive and unnecessary to me. People are hurting, let’s not compound the issue.

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OtherWe are a better country with a strong and viable U.S. Postal Service - and their role in our society is critical. Like any large government entity however, they should be operating with the benefit of the latest and best business practices and efficiencies, and holding management accountable to a high level of expectation. I would evaluate any reform ideas within the context of that expectation.

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OtherThere's no question that student debt is a drag to economic activity and it is quickly mounting. Student loan forgiveness could provide an immediate shot of adrenaline to the economy, which would be positive. In order for me to support an amnesty program, it would have to be very targeted to benefit the students who need it the most. Those with the ability to pay should continue to do so. Those who decide not to put their college degree to use should not be eligible for forgiveness.

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NoGun policy should be debated and legislated at the state level.

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Sara Jacobs

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YesThe United States spends more on domestic public safety and less on domestic public services than almost all of its peer countries, and yet has higher crime rates. Due to budget cuts and small-government philosophies, we have increasingly relied on the police to address all the problems that we have in society, when even they agree they are neither trained nor best equipped to address them. We need a serious rebalance of our priorities and our budget. We need to make greater investments in social services. We need to demilitarize the police. And we don’t have time to wait. But funding is only one piece of the conversation. While much of what needs to be done to reform community-police relations must be done at the local level — by mayors, city councils, district attorneys, and elected sheriffs who oversee police budgets, oversight, contracts and rules — there is also a lot that needs to be done at the federal level. We need pre-employment screening for racial attitudes, and to create a national database so that law enforcement officers who are fired from one department for cause are not able to be hired into another. We need to update the federal criminal code on police misconduct to cover not only willful violations, but also those who act in reckless disregard of human life and people’s constitutional rights. We need an amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act to discontinue transfers of military weapons to police — because weapons of war don’t belong on our streets. And we need to set national standards on use of force — including de-escalation, use of force reporting and duty to intervene, and a national ban on chokehold and carotid restraints. The federal government should mandate and fund vastly improved training — including racial bias and de-escalation training — and compel states to ban no-knock warrants. A recent study found that in San Diego, the Black male suspension rate in schools is 206% higher than the district average. We need to end the school-to-prison pipeline by reforming school disturbance laws to emphasize intervention rather than detention or arrest and funding counselors instead of police officers on school campuses. And we should compel the Department of Education to reinstate the 2014 federal guidance around suspensions and expulsions. We also need to recognize the broader context that policing operates in. The United States has systematically underinvested in African American communities. From redlining to Black Americans being ineligible for the post-World War II GI Bill and many New Deal Programs, to the Tulsa race massacre that destroyed Black Wall Street and the wealth that had been accumulated, the racial wealth gap today is staggering. In San Diego, before the COVID-19 pandemic, despite being about 4% of the population, 1 in 3 Black children lived in families experiencing poverty. Not to mention the incredibly high maternal mortality rate for Black women. We have a lot of work to do.

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YesFamilies are struggling right now, and Congress needs to immediately pass legislation that provides relief. I was glad to see the CDC and HUD announce a nationwide eviction moratorium, but we know that an eviction moratorium without support to renters and homeowners is just kicking the can down the road, so Congress must also include at least $100 billion in emergency rental assistance, and a $75 billion relief fund for homeowners so that families can be assured that they can stay in their homes even as these moratoriums run out and they are faced with months of accrued back-pay. And Congress should fund at least 750,000 Emergency Housing Vouchers targeted to the most vulnerable families. We must ensure that both renters, and small landlords who have invested their savings into homeownership, are able to make it through this crisis. And we know that it is both more cost-effective, and better for families, to prevent eviction in the first place. So we need programs like those in the Housing Emergencies Lifeline Program (HELP) Act, which focus on preventing evictions by providing federal funding for legal counsel and emergency assistance in eviction courts, and limiting their effect on future credit scores. And we need to provide resources to homelessness service systems to rapidly rehouse those that have been evicted, and to provide safe non-congregate shelter alternatives. The stimulus checks and additional $600 in expanded unemployment benefits in the CARES Act were able to prevent the worst effects of the economic crisis on families. Congress must extend the expanded unemployment benefits and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA). And Congress should send out monthly stimulus checks to families, similar to the one-time payment that was in the CARES Act but with increased benefits for minor dependents. And this assistance should be extended until the unemployment rate reaches a certain level, instead of creating arbitrary political deadlines that have no correlation to our economic needs.

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YesPublic health orders exist to support public health, so they need to be followed. Our government at every level needs to do everything it can to support individuals and small businesses struggling through this pandemic, so that no one feels as though they are choosing between public health and financial stability. With uncertainty about being able to pay rent and with the Paycheck Protection Program funding running out before many small business owners could access it, too many have had to close their doors or lay off, furlough, or cut the hours of their employees, which further exacerbates our problems. Additional support is needed to protect our small businesses and to keep our economic infrastructure in place, so that San Diegans can return to work as soon as it is safe to do so — but not before it is safe to do so. And as I mentioned above, Congress must extend the expanded unemployment benefits and the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) — and should send out monthly stimulus checks to families, similar to the one-time payment that was in the CARES Act but with increased benefits for minor dependents. This assistance should be extended until the unemployment rate reaches a certain level, instead of creating arbitrary political deadlines that have no correlation to our economic needs.

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NoProtecting the Postal Service is personal for me: my aunt and uncle are 30-year postal workers in Normal Heights, and they're both serving as essential workers during this pandemic. So much of our economy and our democracy relies on a strong and successful Postal Service — as one of the largest employers of women, minorities, and veterans; a primary engine of small businesses; the trusted go-between for seniors and veterans receiving prescriptions; and a cornerstone of a safe and viable election. I do not support privatization nor do I support Postmaster General DeJoy’s rapid organizational realignment of the U.S. Postal Service. I do very much support overturning the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006, which requires the Postal Service to hold in cash reserves enough funds to cover employee pensions for the next 75 years — essentially pre-funding all retiree benefits. That legislation catapulted the Postal Service into holding billions of dollars of debt unnecessarily, and dramatically harmed a system that hundreds of millions of Americans rely on as a public good.

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NoImmigrations and customs enforcement is not and should not be the responsibility of local law enforcement, who typically have neither been trained nor have the resources to enforce our immigration laws or to prevent abuse. Not only do we need laws that make racial profiling illegal, it’s clear that we need wholesale reform of CBP and ICE, so that we can enforce our immigration laws in a humane and just way.

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YesI support the current suspension of federal student loan payments and setting zero percent interest rates. Much like my plans for expanded unemployment insurance, I believe this suspension and the corresponding interest rate should stay in place until our economy has rebounded from the COVID-19 crisis, instead of creating arbitrary political deadlines that have no correlation to our economic needs. I will also advocate for programs to help refinance debt to lower interest rates after the crisis; allow those in bankruptcy to discharge student debt; and provide more debt forgiveness options for young people doing their best to open a business, invest in innovation, and improve their communities, whether through teaching, caregiving, or other forms of public service, by expanding the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program.

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YesHealth care is a fundamental human right and we need to do everything we can to get to universal coverage. It’s an embarrassment that here in the United States we still don’t guarantee health care to all our people. Having travelled to many other countries, I’ve seen first-hand how universal coverage is an achievable goal, especially for the wealthiest country in the world. Many examples across the world show that a strong public role in health care can provide affordable, universal coverage. As such, I am proud to support Medicare for All. Given the high rate of unemployment right now — with millions losing their employer-sponsored health care, if they had it to begin with — I think this is an ideal time to transition our system. This pandemic has also shown just how much we have underinvested in our public health infrastructure. Donald Trump has horribly mishandled this crisis, but we were also underprepared before he took office, with the CDC’s funding falling by ten percent since 2009. This pandemic has also laid bare just how unequal our health care system is — with Black Americans dying at more than double the rate of White Americans from COVID-19, not to mention the already high Black maternal mortality rate. While the focus of health care reform has understandably been on coverage, I believe these disparate impacts show that we must also focus on access and quality of care. We also need to hold bad actors accountable for jacking up prices unnecessarily and taking advantage of a public health crisis. We need to work to bring down costs for all prescription drugs, ban drug companies from spending money on advertising instead of research, and use federal investment to ensure we are developing the kinds of drugs that will have the most health benefits, not the biggest profits.

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YesI support comprehensive federal background check legislation and more funding to enforce the laws. Everyone who purchases a gun in this country should have to undergo a criminal background check, regardless of where or from whom they purchase their gun, which means we need to close loopholes like the gun show loophole. I also support a federal gun licensing system, and background checks required on ammunition sales nationwide, similar to what was recently implemented here in California. And we need to hold gun manufacturers and gun store owners liable when their products are sold and used illegally. I also believe that we need to ban assault weapons.

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YesClimate change is one of the biggest threats faced by humanity, and we need to do far more to stop it. That’s why I support a Green New Deal. We need to transition to an entirely clean energy economy by 2030, starting with the most polluting sources of energy first. We need to make dramatic investments in clean energy – and in doing so, make sure clean energy jobs pay well and are good union jobs. And we must repair and upgrade our existing energy infrastructure to reduce pollution, save families money, and remain competitive in a 21st-century global economy.

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Ammar Campa-Najjar

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Darrell Issa

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Jim Debello

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Barbara Bry

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OtherI support a fully funded law enforcement agency with the proper training. As Mayor I will review the budget of the departments to determine where there is frivolous spending and divert funds away from that to areas that need it, such as social services.

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YesYes, I support a fully funded program from State or Federal funds that will help renters with rent. I voted to establish a relief fund, but the city does not have the resources to adequately address this issue. A moratorium on rent or evictions without state or federal rent relief is an empty promise by politicians, and will put San Diego renters in a worse position than they are now.

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YesYes, but not by police officers. For chronic violators of public health orders, we should use other less costly city employees who have the ability to write citations. Enforcement will keep the public healthy and ultimately reduce the amount of time we have to wear masks.

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OtherI support the post office and its commitment to delivering ballots on time. The reorganization of the post office is something that takes place at the federal level of government, not by the mayor or city government.

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YesIn the primary, I voted yes on raising the TOT tax to fund expansion of the Convention Center.

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YesI have supported community plan updates that increased densities near transportation corridors. I oppose state mandates that undercut local community plans.

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NoUntil there is a consensus on regional transportation planning and the role of MTS in those plans, it is not appropriate to seek a tax increase.

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YesI have argued for a stronger focus on the root causes of homelessness, including mental health and substance abuse issues. Recent experience with use of the Convention Center to accommodate homeless during the pandemic has shown that when mental health and substance abuse counseling and other assistance is tied to a physical shelter, prospects for positive outcomes are significantly enhanced.

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OtherI think individual communities should have input on the appropriate cap for their community.

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Todd Gloria

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OtherWhile I believe law enforcement should continue to be adequately funded to serve our communities, I have long been concerned about our over-reliance on police to respond to issues of homelessness and mental health. It makes no sense to put armed law enforcement officers in roles better suited for social workers, counselors, and specially trained clinicians. As Mayor, I intend to work with the County and the community to reimagine how we respond to emergencies and persons needing assistance. This means more social workers and mental health professionals on-call to respond to situations. This is a necessary change that I am committed to making. Whether or not that means funds need to be diverted remains to be seen.

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YesYes – in fact, I think it’s a must. As a State Assemblymember, I haven’t waited to provide relief to tenants and landlords. I proudly supported protections through January 2021 so that neither can be evicted or foreclosed on. As Mayor, I will not sit by and watch mass evictions happen to those impacted by COVDI-19. I will use my experience and knowledge from my state and federal service, as well as my relationships in Sacramento and Washington D.C., to push for relief packages that will help San Diegans pay back owed rent and ensure landlords can make their mortgages to avoid foreclosure. I will also ensure the City does everything in its power to make this happen as well.

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YesI recognize the pandemic is hard on all of us. Virtually every aspect of our lives is being impacted, but the fact is none of us is immune to COVID-19, and more than 200,000 of our fellow Americans have died from this virus. The only way we get through this, return to some sense of normalcy, and reopen our economy is by following the public health guidance. Protecting the health of the population as a whole is the very definition of public health. We must care about the health of others as much as we care about our own.

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YesThe U.S. Postal Service is such an integral part of American life that we don’t even think about what it would be like not to be able to depend on it. We need to develop a long-term funding plan that allows it to continue to operate and keep politics out of it.

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YesI endorsed Measure C and over 65% of San Diegans voted to approve it in March. I think it’s time to stop talking about expanding the Convention Center and actually get it done. An expanded Convention Center will be an economic driver for our region and those additional resources we can use to take care of our city. I believe it’s also critically important to establish a dedicated funding stream for homelessness so we can get more of our homeless neighbors off the streets and into care. Also, we have to drive more investment into our infrastructure challenges, which this measure will do. These benefits are even more important at a time when we are facing high unemployment and significant revenue shortfalls due to the recession.

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YesWe have to build more housing and we should do so near jobs and existing public transit infrastructure. I reject the idea that we should build anything anywhere – that’s not smart growth. I believe that if every community does its part, we can help solve our housing crisis by encouraging construction of accessory dwelling units, duplexes, garden-style apartments and row homes without compromising community character.

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OtherI did support this measure when it was initially proposed, but MTS has decided not to move forward with this proposal due to COVID-19. I do believe a world-class city like San Diego deserves a world-class public transportation system – and, San Diegans deserve more choices as to how to get around our city.. We must increase the frequency of our buses and trolleys, expand service to areas that currently don’t have it, make our transit system safer for riders, and so much more. I will look to make forward progress on all of this as Mayor.

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YesAt the very least, the temporary bridge shelters are providing a temporary shelter for some of our homeless – and we can’t just put them back on the street especially in the midst of a pandemic. However, as Mayor, I will look to make sure these bridge shelters live up to what their true intent should be: a bridge to permanent housing.

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YesI see raising the cap on cannabis dispensaries as a way to increase legal access and help us stop the black market. Maintaining the cap as it stands is not a recipe for a successful legal market or equitable access for residents across the city. We should assist those who are following the rules, operating safely, and creating good jobs. Overly restrictive rules have created a large illicit market that is bad for consumers, communities, and law enforcement.

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Chris Ward

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YesI called for the reallocation of resources from Police Department overtime toward programs and initiatives that will support the work to come out of San Diego’s new Office of Race & Equity. I was the only councilmember to vote against this year’s budget, in part because calls I was echoing to use federal CARES Act dollars should have gone to a rental assistance fund I created. I also led the Regional Task Force on the Homeless to pass the Unsheltered Outreach Policy Guidelines last January to be implemented across San Diego County. These guidelines would begin restructuring how we focus resources and respond to calls pertaining to homelessness by prioritizing outreach workers first to engage and assists those in need and only having police help as appropriate.

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YesWe need to be doing everything we can to help our struggling neighbors make it through this unprecedented pandemic. That is why I introduced the Rental Assistance Program to the City Council in June when it passed unanimously. We were able to allocate over $15.1 million in CARES Act funding. With the help of the SDHC, we’ve ensured that every eligible applicant that applied is receiving rental assistance.

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YesSan Diego has already had more than 43,000 COVID-19 cases, and 742 San Diegans have lost their lives to the deadly virus. Everyone must do their part to follow the State and County Public Health Orders strictly so we can overcome this global pandemic and get San Diego fully re-opened. Local law enforcement should be citing both individuals and businesses that continue to violate public health orders and put more San Diegans at risk.

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NoThe US Postal Service is a foundational institution that all Americans rely on for everything from core communications, to online shopping, to receiving their vital prescriptions, to voting. The USPS has kept mail service affordable for Americans for generations, and protecting this fundamental institution should remain a top priority. The changes we’ve seen carried out by the Trump Administration are dangerous. Mail delivery slowdowns, drop box removals, and the decommissioning of sorting machines are clearly politically motivated actions that need to be reversed.

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YesWe must continue to provide the full spectrum of systems to assist and house those who are homeless in our community. But we provide this with low barriers, so entry points to our system do not exclude anyone who is seeking the help. Outreach, shelter, and a range of housing models are a connected path toward self-sufficiency. Combining shelter, healthcare, employment, housing navigation, and other wraparound services in one place gives people the support to get well, get rested, and stay connected to their path. Our bridge shelter network also provides dedicated space for families, women and youth, disabled clients, and others with special needs giving them a place where they feel safe and are surrounded by the appropriate staff to help them end their homelessness.

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YesCutting the power for residents may be the risk-averse call in the short term, but we must be more proactive in reducing the risk in the first place and assist in alternative energy systems for affected communities. It’s not right to lose electricity, but it is understandable to de-energize when the conditions are too risky for wildfire. The increased intensity and frequency of fire are inextricably connected to climate change. To reverse this trend we need to accelerate the transition from fossil fuels and shift towards a zero carbon economy. We must also stop sprawl development and not put more lives at risk during these seemingly year-round wildfire seasons. Finally, our electric infrastructure needs to meet the standards of these drier conditions. In the meantime the right thing to do is assist rural communities through stronger notification for their planning, support significant brush management and reduce dangers of high hazard areas, and increase micro-grid, local solar, and battery storage systems to maintain power when the primary grid dependent on energized transmission lines proves dangerous.

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YesWhile I support continued racing at Del Mar, we should achieve the strongest reforms that will reduce fatalities and ensure the wellbeing of the animal. Like many I am alarmed and troubled when learning of another death at our fairgrounds. We must make sure that use of our public facilities comes with the best possible care, veterinary support, and commitment to the welfare of animals. I’m reminded that the Equine Injury Database currently holds Del Mar as the safest major track in the United States. At the same time, nationally we've seen increasing amounts of equine fatalities both on and off the track - estimates say 800 a year for over a decade. That must stop. Race horses are athletes and historically have been treated as such. Making sure that issues like punishing race schedules, lack of regulation on drugs and medicines, neglect, and the highest standards for proactive evaluations are upheld so any signs of distress or risk are heeded. Horse racing has a rich history at the Del Mar race track. As a public facility which is currently in peril, this is something I’ll be looking to evaluate more closely.

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NoAs cities have built into each other and, for a number of reasons, we should not accept further sprawl, Californians have an interest to make sure sufficient housing at all income levels are available for current and achievable for future residents. Housing mandates are established to encourage local jurisdictions to share that growth pressure proportionally and with variation for infrastructure and other considerations to produce much needed housing. As much as our region and the entire state faces a housing crisis and enormous production needs, more housing necessitates changes in some communities, and not all are willing partners in accommodating. Cities that have the capacity to grow but refuse not only fail to be a part of the big picture, but also compound effect on neighboring cities who might be trying to accommodate but on their own can’t support all the regional pressure for housing balance. Housing mandates can level the playing field to ensure local jurisdictions are guided to play a relative part and ensure jurisdictions are thinking creatively on strategies, practices, and policies to get there. State production requirements affiliated with local cities' Housing Element and Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) ensure cities analyze development capacity and make a reasonable estimate of housing production over a period of 8 years, especially for lower income households. Production goals for lower income households are important as the market won't always deliver here on its own; government aid should accompany mandates to help jurisdictions meet the mandates and support mixed income communities.

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Sarah Davis

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YesLaw enforcement officers are not the appropriate people to address homelessness, people experiencing mental health crises, and many other situations. Funding should be allocated to public service agencies and professionals who are more appropriate for those situations.

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YesI support cancellation of rent for those affected by the pandemic, and using local, state and federal funds to support small scale landlords who rely on rental income.

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YesFlagrant, repeated, high impact violations should be cited, such as businesses which openly defy requirements and individuals who hold large gatherings.

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NoThe US Postal Service is a critical public service, essential to small businesses and individuals, and an important employer of veterans and other Americans.

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NoCalifornia needs to use the evidence supported "Housing First" model. San Diego's temporary housing in shelters should not be exported across the state. Rather, we need to invest those funds in preventing homelessness, rapidly rehousing people who are losing their housing, and providing permanent supportive housing to chronically homeless individuals.

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OtherCutting power to thousands of residents can be the right thing to do for rare unforeseen circumstances causing extreme fire risk. However, SDG&E and PG&E have been aware for decades that climate change is real and how it could affect California. These utilities should be held accountable for decades of neglecting infrastructure upgrades and failing to adapt to the changing climate.

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NoNo. The state-owned Del Mar Fairgrounds should stop subsidizing a luxury industry that relies on exploiting animals and reallocate the land use to benefit more Californians. Specifically, the Del Mar Fairgrounds could provide education, training, and demonstration for green energy and agriculture, sustainable housing, and preservation and re-wilding of open space.

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OtherI support the existing Regional Housing Needs Allocation mandates. I would evaluate other potential housing mandates on a case by case basis.

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Brian Maienschein

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OtherLaw enforcement is essential for protecting our communities and they need to be appropriately funded. However, I do believe that law enforcement involvement is not always the best solution in every case. Persons with mental illnesses, substance abuse issues or those who are experiencing homelessness would greatly benefit from increased funding for social services. Investing more in social services can shift some of the burden away from law enforcement so they can focus on keeping criminals off of our streets.

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YesCOVID-19 has hit working families hard. Both tenants and landlords are struggling to pay their bills. I think we should explore any and all ways to help tenants and landlords who are in distress.

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OtherCOVID-19 presents a very real threat to public health and it needs to be taken seriously. It is incumbent upon all of us to take reasonable actions to keep others, especially the most vulnerable among us, safe. There needs to be a process in place to ensure people are not putting others at risk and that process may include citing people or businesses for egregious violations that threaten health and safety.

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OtherI do not support dismantling the US Postal Service.

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YesI definitely support providing temporary shelters to house the homeless. However, we need to also be looking for more permanent solutions to mental health and homelessness. Recognizing that mental health issues are a significant driver of homelessness, I have advocated for policies that invest in supportive housing. As San Diego’s Commissioner on Homelessness, I created Project 25 which identified several of the county's most vulnerable chronically homeless individuals who were costing the county millions of dollars in hospital visits and other resources. We were able to get them into supportive housing and the necessary resources. The project saved millions of dollars in its first year. We need to end the stigma surrounding mental health and continue to raise awareness of how successful programs can be when they are adequately funded.

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YesAs someone who led the response and recovery efforts to the fires in 2003 and 2007, I never want to see our communities go through that again. It is unfortunate that shutting down power is one of the only short-term ways to prevent devastating wildfires. This is not an acceptable long-term solution. In the Assembly, I supported legislation to require the utility companies to come up with plans to avoid future public safety power shutoffs.

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OtherI have authored many bills in the legislature to protect animals and would like to see Del Mar Fairgrounds look towards the future and become a leader in modernizing state fair operations.

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OtherI believe cities deserve to have a say in developing and preserving the character of our neighborhoods. However, rather than just blatantly rejecting housing policies, I would like to see local governments be more willing to come to the table and be active participants in developing solutions for our housing crisis.

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Tasha Horvath

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Melanie Burkholder

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June Cutter

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