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Groundbreaking For New Ocean Science Project At UCSD

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Aired 9/15/09

Ground has been broken on two new ocean science buildings on the UC San Diego campus. The project is expected to create more than 1,000 construction jobs.

— Ground has been broken on two new ocean science buildings on the UC San Diego campus. The project is expected to create more than 1,000 construction jobs.

Groundbreaking Ceremony at UC San Diego for the new ocean science buildings. From left to right:  Patrick Gallagher, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Standards and Testing; Tony Haymet, Director of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Gary Locke, U.S. Secretary of Commerce; San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders and Margaret Spring, Chief of Staff for the NOAA.
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Above: Groundbreaking Ceremony at UC San Diego for the new ocean science buildings. From left to right: Patrick Gallagher, Deputy Director of the National Institute of Standards and Testing; Tony Haymet, Director of the Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Gary Locke, U.S. Secretary of Commerce; San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders and Margaret Spring, Chief of Staff for the NOAA.

The federal government is paying for most of the project with a grant and federal stimulus dollars. Construction is expected to start this year and finish in late 2011.

One building will house the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Southwest Fisheries Science Center. Research in the building will include the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems and fisheries.

The second building is funded with a grant from another federal agency and by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke says the lab facility will be used for marine research.

"This investment will also create and support jobs and add to our storehouse of knowledge about both climate and our marine environment," Locke says.

Construction of the second lab is scheduled to start in early 2011 and be completed in late 2012.

Locke says the two facilities will help provide a healthy ocean legacy for future generations.

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