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Veterans And Military Members Get Career Help Aboard The USS Midway

Evening Edition

Above: Veterans and active-duty troops preparing to leave behind their military careers got help Friday at a job fair on the USS Midway.

Veterans and active-duty troops preparing to leave behind their military careers got help Friday at a job fair on the USS Midway.

More active duty personnel are looking for work in the civilian world as budget pressure is shrinking the armed forces.

Nearly 30 potential employers and agencies that help veterans set up shop on the Midway, while military personnel introduced themselves and handed out resumes.

Retired Army Sergeant Major Jack Tilley says the transition out of structured military life requires an adjustment, especially when looking for work.

“It's a little bit different. How do you network? How do you talk to people? What kind of resume do you need? Education, I think, is a key to success. Having your bachelor’s or master’s degree, or even doctorate degree,” Tilley said. “So it’s those kinds of things that I think are very critical. But it’s just that simple adjustment out of the service that’s the hardest part.”

San Diego defense contractor Sentek was at the fair, looking to augment its local workforce. Recruiter Cheryl Lang says Sentek seeks out veterans because the company works closely with the Navy.

“They already know the language that most Sentek-ians speak, and that our customers speak as well. So the learning curve is a little less, and they just have a really great sense of capability. They’re really eager and determined to continue supporting the warfighter,” Lang said.

Jared Gray is leaving the Air Force in just two months. He’s already looking for something to do next, and says the job fair was reassuring.

“It’s comforting, just to know that somebody is actually interested in you and your skills that you’ve learned while you were in the military. So it makes it not as nerve-racking,” Gray said.

Defense officials are planning to reduce the size of the active-duty Army to 450,000 troops, the smallest standing Army since 1940.

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