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Has The Job Market Rebounded For San Diego’s 2013 College Grads?

Evening Edition

Aired 5/14/13 on KPBS Midday Edition.

GUESTS:

James Tarbox, Ph.D., Director, SDSU Career Center

Mollie Smith, Dir., Occupational and Non-Credit Programs

Transcript

Graduation ceremonies get underway this week at many San Diego college campuses. But some wonder if they'll be able to secure the job they're looking for, especially in light of the economic downturn of the last few years.

There have been many stories written about a tough job market forcing many new grads to move back home after struggling to make ends meet and pay off their student loans.

But when the class of 2013 enters the job market, it may find it a little more welcoming. Unemployment is down and job prospects are up.

Comments

Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | May 14, 2013 at 4:13 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

I would say it depends on their degree. Communications or liberal arts degree? I hope you enjoy making my cappuccino.

Math, science, computers? Welcome to the 53% my friend!

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Avatar for user 'bailarin'

bailarin | May 14, 2013 at 4:21 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

Millions of repetitive low skilled consumer goods manufacturing and supply chain jobs were outsourced to China. These jobs created jobs for college educated professionals and this fact was ignored by the U.S. Congress and White House when they with the urging of their benefactors, Corporate America and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, made China's trade status to Permanent Normal Trade Relation.

MFN China, the predecessor of PNTR China, was suspended due to transfer of sensitive military technology. With that concern the U.S. Congress made MFN China permanent (PNTR China) at the insistence of Corporate America, U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Ivy League economists. PNTR China is TREASON.

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Avatar for user 'Alex_Grebenshchikov'

Alex_Grebenshchikov | May 14, 2013 at 4:26 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

"But some wonder if they'll be able to secure the job they're looking for"
This is the key phrase here - what job are they looking for? There are plenty of jobs out there, but depending on their degree, probably not what they are "looking for".
The primary problem new four-year degree college grads have is a false expectation that a degree guarantees a decent job. And this false expectation stems from a deeper root problem of a sense of entitlement. "I went to college, therefore I deserve a job that I like." Unfortunately, a four year degree in Chicano Studies or Art History will not land you an awesome job unless you consider a job that doesn't require a four-year degree to be awesome. But then why spend the time and money, just jump right into the food service industry. Science and engineering degrees are a much better bet, but even then, you will be a bottom level employee unless you are a genius or you have a graduate degree.

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Avatar for user 'CaliforniaDefender'

CaliforniaDefender | May 14, 2013 at 5:47 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

The notion that a college degree is a right and not a privilege has cheapened it.

Everybody can get a degree now regardless of intellectual ability. Most college grads I interview are no smarter than a high school grad, just four years older, and deep in debt.

As JM said so well, if your degree isn't in a hard science, have fun making my cappuccino.

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Avatar for user 'RegularChristian'

RegularChristian | May 15, 2013 at 7:30 a.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

Rebounded from what?

Not too long ago a single income household was enough to support a family of four!

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Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | May 15, 2013 at 10:39 a.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

Bailarin - I sure wish that foxconn labor wasn't outsourced to China. I would love to assemble 6000 iPhones a day until the cartilage in my fingers disintegrated. Oh well.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | May 15, 2013 at 11:52 a.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

AL GERBERKALASHNIKOV, and who, pray tell, is talking Chicano Studies or Art History???

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | May 15, 2013 at 11:58 a.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

"The notion that a college degree is a right and not a privilege has cheapened it."

Yes, CA, off, I'm sure 1957 was a dark, dark year in your view.

"Everybody can get a degree now regardless of intellectual ability. Most college grads I interview are no smarter than a high school grad, just four years older, and deep in debt."

I'm afraid to ask what you use are your assessment!!! Yikes!!!

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | May 15, 2013 at 12:03 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

John Mark inquires:

Math, science, computers? Welcome to the 53% my friend!

Just so happens some our biggest high school districts DO NOT offer introductory computer science classes even in ROP, UNLIKE, say school districts in OC. Now when the student transfers to a four-year college, he or she is already a step behind those OC kids.

You want more of our kids to major in computer science, John Mark? Then maybe PAY MORE property taxes.

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Avatar for user 'Alex_Grebenshchikov'

Alex_Grebenshchikov | May 15, 2013 at 3:24 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

Missaccomplished - I am just offering examples of degrees that leave a graduate no more qualified for a good job than they were before they started college. In other words, the title of this article is a question, and my answer is "not if the college grads majored in Chicano Studies or Art History, for example, but possibly if they majored in science or engineering".

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Avatar for user 'RLA'

RLA | May 15, 2013 at 7:20 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

While you are concerned about the college grads what about the thousands of skilled and semi-skilled hardworking folks whose jobs in construction, manufacturing, etc. have been run out of California by our "enlightened" leaders in Sacramento?

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | May 15, 2013 at 9:03 p.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

An education is an investment. Sometimes it is a good one and sometimes not.

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Avatar for user 'Alex_Grebenshchikov'

Alex_Grebenshchikov | May 16, 2013 at 9:08 a.m. ― 1 year, 2 months ago

benz72, well stated. RLA, if you go to the store and there are two identical gallons of milk in front of you, except that one is twice the cost of the other, would you not buy the cheaper one? Now suppose you learn that the more expensive milk was produced in California, and the cheaper one was produced in Texas. Does this change your decision on which milk to purchase? If it does, why? Nothing has changed in the final product, only your knowledge about where it was produced. California business owners are faced with analogous decisions, as is the California government itself. If they can get the same end result in construction or manufacturing, etc. for cheaper, why not save money? For businesses, they are simply maximizing profits, which is their primary objective. For the government, they are using our tax dollars and I would hope they would use them as efficiently as possible. Using tax dollars to create California jobs where they are not, due to competition from outside of California, needed seems more like welfare or socialism than a free economy, which ultimately leads to lack of incentive to innovate and produce the best products.

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Avatar for user 'jaker_WV'

jaker_WV | June 2, 2013 at 7:10 a.m. ― 1 year, 1 month ago

A lot of it amounts to that kids went to college for "any degree", and didn't get applicable work experience to add to their resume. I work full time for Blue Mountain, Inc. as a GIS Analyst, used to work for a welding shop, fabrication shop, have my black-hat cert. and safety cards from 8 coal mines, and used to be a Jr. Technician at a prototype facility in Auburn Hills, MI where I worked for Audi, Honda, Toyota, the "Big 3" (Mopar/Ford/GM), etc. on turbo and emission systems, transmissions, etc. I am also going for my Engineering degree, for which I have plenty of applicable work experience. I have coworkers who are getting their paralegals while doing deed and title research, or getting their draftsman degrees while working as surveyors, even one who works doing "one call" (locating underground pipelines) while taking the new Pipeline and Oil Rig program they offer at the local university. I see kids come in with a BA in Geography applying for a GIS position with a 2.8 GPA, and they worked 1 month at McDonalds, we still offer them a position, same starting wage as I had, $12/hr, and they scoff at the thought of working for "such a pittance". They expect $60k/yr, with vacation first year, to be able to call in sick whenever they want, and just don't understand the real working world at all... and I say this from experience (I could name names if I wanted to).

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