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AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: The Abolitionists

Airs Tuesdays, January 8 - 22, 2013 at 9 p.m. on KPBS TV

Above: John Brown (T. Ryder Smith on right) tries to persuade Frederick Douglass (Richard Brooks on left) to join his planned assault on Harper's Ferry as Shields Green (Thomas Coleman in the center) looks on.

Vividly bringing to life the epic struggles of the men and women who fought to end slavery, "The Abolitionists" tells the intertwined stories of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina Grimké, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown. Fighting body and soul, they led the most important civil rights crusade in American history.

The Abolitionist Map of America

Explore the story of the abolitionist movement in America through our interactive map. Dozens of museums, institutions and PBS stations have partnered with AMERICAN EXPERIENCE to bring you archival images, documents and videos related to abolitionism. If you are interested in contributing materials on behalf of an organization, please email american_experience@wgbh.org to become a partner.

Courtesy of WGBH/Antony Platt

Jeanine Serralles as Angelina Grimké, a prominent Southern abolitionist.

Courtesy of The New-York Historical Society

Portrait of Frederick Douglass, circa 1860.

Courtesy of Special Collection, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

Portrait of William Lloyd Garrison, circa 1861.

Courtesy of WGBH/Antony Platt

Kate Lyn Sheil as Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of "Uncle Tom’s Cabin."

What began as a pacifist movement became a fiery and furious struggle that forever changed the nation. Black and white, Northerners and Southerners, poor and wealthy, these passionate anti-slavery activists tore the nation apart in order to form a more perfect union.

This three-part series, which tells the story largely through period drama narrative, airs 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation took effect in January 1863.

Directed by Rob Rapley, "The Abolitionists" stars Richard Brooks, Neal Huff, Jeanine Serralles, Kate Lyn Sheil, and T. Ryder Smith.

Part One "1820s - 1838" airs Tuesday, January 8 at 9 p.m. - Shared beliefs about slavery bring together Angelina Grimké, the daughter of a Charleston plantation family, who moves north and becomes a public speaker against slavery; Frederick Douglass, a young slave who becomes hopeful when he hears about the abolitionists; William Lloyd Garrison, who founds the newspaper The Liberator, a powerful voice for the movement; Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose first trip to the South changes her life and her writing; and John Brown, who devotes his life to the cause.

The abolitionist movement, however, is in disarray and increasing violence raises doubts about the efficacy of its pacifist tactics.

Part Two "1838 - 1854" airs Tuesday, January 15 at 9 p.m. - Douglass escapes slavery, eventually joining Garrison in the anti-slavery movement. Threatened with capture by his former owner, Douglass flees to England, returning to the U.S. in 1847. He launches his own anti-slavery paper. John Brown meets with Douglass, revealing his radical plan to raise an army, attack plantations and free the slaves.

Harriet Beecher Stowe publishes "Uncle Tom’s Cabin" in 1852. A best-seller, and then wildly successful stage play, this influential novel changes the hearts and minds of millions of Americans. The divide between North and South deepens, touching off a crisis that is about to careen out of control.

Part Three "1854 - Emancipation And Victory" airs Tuesday, January 22 at 9 p.m. - The battle between pro-slavery and free-soil contingents rises to fever pitch. During his raid on Harpers Ferry, John Brown is captured, then executed, becoming a martyr for the cause.

Abraham Lincoln is elected president in 1860. Southern states secede, war breaks out and the conflict unexpectedly drags on. On New Year’s Day 1863, it is announced that Lincoln has emancipated the slaves in rebel territory. African-American men may now enlist in the Union forces; two of Douglass’ sons go to war.

In December 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment is ratified, banning slavery in all states — forever. For almost four decades, the abolitionists have dedicated their lives to this moment. It is a triumph of perseverance, steadfastness, and in the logic and moral power of a movement that never wavered.

AMERICAN EXPERIENCE is on Facebook, and you can follow @AmExperiencePBS on Twitter.

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Map History With Us!

Above: Map history with AMERICAN EXPERIENCE! You can relive the history of the abolitionist movement on AMERICAN EXPERIENCE's Mapping History iPhone app and explore places central to the nation's anti-slavery effort. Dozens of museums, institutions and PBS stations have partnered with AMERICAN EXPERIENCE to bring you archival images, documents and videos related to abolitionism.

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Preview: American Experience: The Abolitionists

Above: Vividly bringing to life the epic struggles of the men and women who fought to end slavery, "The Abolitionists" tells the intertwined stories of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Angelina Grimké, Harriet Beecher Stowe and John Brown. Fighting body and soul, they led the most important civil rights crusade in American history.

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Why We Made 'The Abolitionists'

Above: The makers of "The Abolitionists" describe making a film about a "transformative moment in American history that stemmed from the actions of ordinary individuals."

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Bonus Video: The Abolitionists, Part One

Above: A peak at the first chapter of "The Abolitionists," Part One, premiering January 8, 2013 at 9 p.m. on PBS.

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Who is Frederick Douglass?

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Who is William Lloyd Garrison?

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Who is Angelina Grimké?

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Who is John Brown?

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Who is Harriet Beecher Stowe?

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