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Max Rivlin-Nadler

Reporter

Photo of Max Rivlin-Nadler

Max Rivlin-Nadler is an investigative journalist whose reporting has appeared in outlets such as the New York Times, the New Republic, the Village Voice and Gothamist. His years-long investigation into New York City's arcane civil forfeiture laws led to a series of lawsuits and reforms which altered a practice that had been taking millions from poor communities for decades.

Since moving to San Diego, he has reported extensively on immigration and criminal justice issues, including the treatment of asylum-seekers along the border, last year's District Attorney race, and the criminalization of homelessness in the midst of California's deepening affordability crisis. A native of Queens, New York, Max attended Oberlin College in Ohio, where he majored in creative writing.

Recent Stories by Max Rivlin-Nadler

The outside of the Edward J. Schwartz federal c...

Federal Judge Rules 'Remain In Mexico' Family Must Have Access To Lawyer

Nov. 12
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

A federal judge in San Diego ruled Tuesday that a Guatemalan family of seven in the "Remain In Mexico" program cannot be sent back to Mexico without first having access to a lawyer.

Iraqi-Americans in El Cajon call for the intern...

Iraqi-Americans In El Cajon Plead For International Support Of Iraqi Protesters

Nov. 11
By Claire Trageser, Max Rivlin-Nadler

More than a hundred people gathered in El Cajon on Sunday to support ongoing anti-government protests in Iraq.

Andrea Tecpoyotl-Tepale, a DACA recipient, talk...

Immigrant Activism And The Legacy Of Proposition 187

Nov. 8
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

While the proposition never took effect, Proposition 187 ushered in a generation of immigrant activists that has transformed the California.

The campus of CETYS in Tijuana on October 14, 2019

San Diego Students Going To Mexico For College

Nov. 7
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

A private Tijuana university offers a business degree in English that's become a low-cost alternative for American students. A growing number of U.S. students are crossing into Mexico to pursue college degrees at CETYS.

Attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Uni...

ACLU Files Suit Over Access To Lawyers For Asylum-Seekers Being Sent Back To Mexico

Nov. 5
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

The American Civil Liberties Union filed a class-action lawsuit against Customs and Border Protection on Tuesday, condemning the treatment of asylum-seekers in the “Remain In Mexico” program. The ACLU says that the migrants are not being allowed to see their lawyers.

A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement offi...

Two Years Later, Loopholes Remain In California's Sanctuary Law

Nov. 1
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

Two years later, compliance with California’s “sanctuary state” is a mixed-bag, according to a new report.

A burned-out car in the Morelos neighborhood of...

Wildfires Scorch A Growing Rosarito In Baja California

Oct. 31
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

California isn’t the only region dealing with devastating wildfires. South of the border in Baja California, Mexican firefighters and local authorities have squared off against quick-moving fires that have left local residents with little time to get to safety.

Brittany Ramos-Debarros, a member of About Face...

Four Border Protestors Found Not Guilty Of Ignoring Federal Orders

Oct. 28
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

A magistrate judge ruled that the government had not positively identified that any of the defendants had broken any laws.

The southbound inspection lanes at the San Ysid...

US Will Increase Inspections To Find Guns Bound For Mexico

Oct. 25
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

The effort called “Operation Frozen,” which will increase southbound inspections of cars at the border, comes after a deadly shootout last week in the city of Culiacan, Mexico.

Burnt out vehicles used by gunmen smolder on an...

Violence In Mexico Driving Renewed Migration To The US

Oct. 21
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

As violence reaches deeper into Mexican society, the number of Mexicans arrested at the U.S. southern border has steadily risen, bucking a yearslong decline.

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