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Brown, Whitman Clash In Final Debate

Fireworks, personal attacks and policy differences marked the final debate of California’s governor’s race Tuesday night. Republican Meg Whitman, the former eBAY CEO, and Democratic Attorney General Jerry Brown clashed over the budget, environmental regulations, same-sex marriage and many other issues.

Republican gubernatorial candidate and former eBay CEO Meg Whitman (L) and Democratic gubernatorial candidate and California State Attorney General Jerry Brown shake hands at the conclusion of a debate October 12, 2010 at Dominican University of California in San Rafael, California.
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Above: Republican gubernatorial candidate and former eBay CEO Meg Whitman (L) and Democratic gubernatorial candidate and California State Attorney General Jerry Brown shake hands at the conclusion of a debate October 12, 2010 at Dominican University of California in San Rafael, California.

Poll

Who do you support for California governor?

  • Jerry Brown

    64%
  • Meg Whitman

    35%

367 total votes. (This poll is now closed.)

Both called for changes in the current pension system. Brown said existing employees should increase their contributions.

“We need a two-tier pension system. We have to bargain this collectively. And you sit down with the labor groups, as Arnold has. He’s already gotten some significant concessions. There’s more coming," said Brown.

Whitman said public safety workers deserve a defined benefit program. But for the rest? “New employees have got to come in under a different deal, a 401k-style program for rank and file," said Whitman.

They also disagreed over whether to cut the capital gains tax. Whitman said "yes," Brown said "no." And about who was better equipped to negotiate with the state’s public employee unions.

But the topic that had everyone talking after the debate was when moderator Tom Brokaw asked Brown about a voicemail recording that surfaced last week. One of Brown’s campaign aides called Whitman a “whore.” Brokaw said many women consider that word the same as calling an African American the N-word. Brown responded:

“I don’t agree with that comparison, number one," Brown replied. "Number two, this is a five-week-old private conversation,” he added.

Brown went on to apologize to Whitman. “It’s unfortunate. I’m sorry it happened. I apologize, Ms. Whitman.”

To Whitman, that wasn’t enough. “Every Californian, and especially women, know exactly what’s going on here – and that is a deeply offensive term to women," she replied.

“Well, could I just interject? Brown asked. "Have you chastised your chairman, Pete Wilson, who called the Congress whores to the public sector unions?”

“You know better than that, Jerry," said Whitman. "That’s a completely different thing.”

Sacramento State Government Professor Kim Nalder watched the debate with her students, and led a discussion afterward. She said most voters have already made up their minds, and there was just one potential game-changer.

“The extent to which the "W" comment is damaging to Brown and his response tonight, how well he sort of made up for that. That’s really the only thing that might impact the race down the line.”

Polls have shown the tight race shifting ever so slightly in Brown’s favor, but those polls came after the story about Whitman employing an illegal immigrant as her housekeeper, and before the voicemail using the "W" word surfaced.

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