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San Diego Sets Special Election Date For District 4

The election to replace former City Council President Tony Young will take place on March 26. The council unanimously approved the date at its meeting Monday afternoon. The election will not be consolidated with a state special election in the same area that will be held March 12. Combining the elections could have saved San Diego $100,000, but council members felt it didn’t give potential candidates enough time.

Aired 1/8/13 on KPBS News.

San Diego will hold a special election at the end of March to replace former City Council President Tony Young. But the election is raising a couple sticky issues.

City of San Diego

The new San Diego City Council District 4.

Additionally, the council did not change a local law that prevents neighborhoods added to the district after redistricting from voting in the special election. The law requires the election be based on the 2010 district boundaries, not the current lines. That means the communities of Redwood Village and Rolando Park can not take part in the upcoming election. But Deputy City Attorney Sharon Spivack said the issue goes beyond local control.

"The charter, the municipal code, state law, California Supreme Court opinions, and Constitutional law all support the fact that actually the voters in the old District 4 are considered to be the one whose rights would be violated if the boundaries were to be changed in the middle of an existing term," she said.

Spivack said the city faced a similar situation in 1991. In that case, the City Council tried to use new district lines for an election, was sued and ordered to use the old lines instead.

Young resigned his seat on January 1 to take over the local chapter of the American Red Cross. The city has 90 days from the date of his resignation to hold a special election. If no candidate wins outright, the city must hold a run-off election within 49 days.

Comments

Avatar for user 'Annaorzelarnita'

Annaorzelarnita | January 8, 2013 at 2:47 p.m. ― 1 year, 11 months ago

Simply put, Residents in 3 communities in D9, approximately 6000 registered voters, will have the opportunity to cast their ballot for a Councilmember that will NOT represent them on the San Diego City Council and 2 communities in D4, approximately 5000 registered voters, will not be able to cast their votes for the Councilmember who WILL represent them on the San Diego City Council. Still trying to wrap my head around this ordinance.

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Avatar for user 'B1inRedwoodVillage'

B1inRedwoodVillage | January 8, 2013 at 2:58 p.m. ― 1 year, 11 months ago

So, let me see if I can get this straight. The deputy city attorney says: the voters in the old District 4 are considered to be the one whose rights would be violated if the boundaries were to be changed in the middle of an existing term,"

In what world do people who do not live in the represented area have the right to decide for those who do? It makes no sense. How can people who are NO LONGER represented by District 4 be disenfranchised by not being allowed to vote for someone who will NOT represent them? What world is Ms. Spivak living in? This makes no sense, and it is absolutely contrary to the idea of a representative form of government, which is supposedly what our entire government is based on. This is absolutely contrary to democracy in every way and absolutely illogical to boot. How dare anyone dismiss this in such a fashion and defend it at the same time.

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