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Regulations Ban Homeowners From Renting Out Secondary Residences As Short-Term Rentals

Residents listen to a public discussion about the potential effects of a prop...

Photo by Andrew Bowen

Above: Residents listen to a public discussion about the potential effects of a proposed ordinance regarding short-term rentals in the San Diego City Council chambers, July 16, 2018.

Regulations Ban Home Owners From Renting Out Secondary Residences As Short-Term Rentals

GUEST:

Andrew Bowen, metro reporter, KPBS News

Transcript

San Diego's years-long debate over how to regulate short-term home rentals, like Airbnb and HomeAway, came to a close Monday.

The San Diego City Council voted 6-3 on short-term rental regulations proposed by San Diego Councilwoman Barbara Bry. Homeowners who want to rent out their entire homes will be required to pay $949 each year for a license and may only rent out their primary residence for up to six months of the year.

Chris Cate, Scott Sherman and David Alvarez voted against the plan.

The new rules are set to go into effect in July 2019. The regulations affecting coastal neighborhoods must also be approved by the California Coastal Commission.

Councilwoman Bry said short-term rentals deplete the housing supply, thus exacerbating the housing crisis.

"I'm excited that we were able to do something that's the right policy for our city, and that we talked about housing, which was the right thing to be talking about," Bry said after the vote.

AirBnb host Jeff MacGurn was not happy with the outcome.

"Well let's call it for what it is. It's a ban. They passed a ban today," he said. "It wouldn't allow us to rent out our place. It would also deprive thousands of other San Diegans the opportunity to rent out their places without going underwater."

Ordinances similar to the one passed by the San Diego City Council have ended up in court or on the ballot via a referendum.

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