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Fair Pay To Play Act Puts Full Court Press On NCAA

People watch coverage of the first round of the NCAA college basketball tourn...

Credit: Associated Press

Above: People watch coverage of the first round of the NCAA college basketball tournament at the Westgate Superbook sports book Thursday, March 15, 2018, in Las Vegas.

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Analysts say California's Fair Pay To Play Act could impact college sports across the nation.

Aired: September 24, 2019 | Transcript

While many college coaches earn large salaries, the athletes under their guidance are paid in accolades, scholarships and the drive for championship glory. Now California is changing the game of collegiate sports with the Fair Pay to Play Act.

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The bill would allow college athletes to cash in on endorsement deals and the use of their likeness, which is currently against NCAA regulations. In fact, the NCAA has threatened to ban California schools from competitions if the 'Fair Pay' bill becomes law arguing it would give California schools an unfair recruiting advantage. The bill awaits Governor Gavin Newsom's signature.

"Everyone's expectation is that in some way this will become the law in all 50 states," said Len Simon, an adjunct professor at the University of San Diego School of Law, who had a role in crafting California's Fair Pay to Play Act.

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"I'm loving this legislation because people don't understand that scholarship money can only take you so far. I have known athletes who could not function well because they needed food to eat," said Alicia Gwynn, a former college athlete and widow of baseball great Tony Gwynn.

Alicia Gwynn and Len Simon join Midday Edition to talk about what this legislation could mean for college athletes.

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