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LATEST UPDATES: Racial Justice | Tracking COVID-19 (coronavirus)

A Snapshot Of Who Died From Coronavirus In San Diego County

A lab worker prepares samples to be tested for COVID-19 in San Diego, Feb. 28...

Photo by Matt Hoffman

Above: A lab worker prepares samples to be tested for COVID-19 in San Diego, Feb. 28, 2020.

The San Diego region reached a grim milestone this weekend: there have now been more than 100 reported deaths due to COVID-19.

Of the 113 people who died from the virus as of Monday, just about half of them were white, while just under 33% were Hispanic and just under 10% were Asian, according to data from San Diego County as of Monday.

Only two people who've died so far from the coronavirus in San Diego County were African American.

Listen to this story by Claire Trageser.

A chart showing the deaths due to COVID-19 in San Diego County as of April 27, 2020.

This is just a snapshot and these numbers could change significantly in the coming weeks. Yet, so far San Diego is going against statewide trends, which show that a disproportionate number of people who died were Hispanic or black. Statewide, 43.5% of the people who died were Hispanic and 6.3% were black.

But like elsewhere, the virus is proving to be more fatal to men than women in San Diego County. About 54% of those who died in the county were men, while 46% were women.

And older people are far more vulnerable — the median age of those who’ve died in the county is 78. This is consistent with what is happening throughout the world.

A map showing the deaths due to COVID-19 in San Diego County as of April 27, 2020.

More than half the people who died were from the eastern and southern parts of the county, while the county’s northern coast accounts for the fewest — under 5%.

Almost all of the people who died have had underlying medical conditions — only 3.5% haven't.

A chart showing the deaths due to COVID-19 in San Diego County as of April 27, 2020.

It is highly likely that significantly more deaths have occurred than those reported to the county, said Dr. Doug Richman, an infectious disease specialist at UC San Diego.

"People should know that the numbers we're seeing are underestimates because many people are dying at home or have died without being tested," he said. "Even now that tests are more available, they have only been available to diagnose people with symptoms including fever."

Richman added that people who live in denser populated areas are at more risk, along with those in certain parts of the county, including the border area.

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Photo of Claire Trageser

Claire Trageser
Investigative Reporter

opening quote marksclosing quote marksAs a member of the KPBS investigative team, my job is to hold the powerful in San Diego County accountable. I've done in-depth investigations on political campaigns, police officer misconduct and neighborhood quality of life issues.

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