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Rebecca Jade And The Cold Fact Perform Songs From Their New Album 'Running Out Of Time'

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The San Diego band Rebecca Jade and the Cold Fact have a funk infused-soul sound that hearkens back to the 70s Motown and Stax-record era.

Show transcript

Speaker 1: 00:00 Summertime brings up the music in San Diego. Today we're bringing you another installment of our summer music series. Here is midday edition cohost Jane Heideman,

Speaker 2: 00:11 Rebecca Jade and the cold fat have a funk infused soul sound that hearkens back to the 1970s Motown and stax record era with an all star band from the redwoods music collective. They focus their chops on in the pocket grooves with a hint of blues. Their last album received multiple San Diego music awards and they join us today in studio to share some of their brand new songs from their upcoming album running out of time. Here they are with their song. Nothing left for us,

Speaker 3: 00:53 Huh?

Speaker 4: 00:55 [inaudible] today to one in the U K back. I would say too with my, I hate [inaudible] money then. Either way too. My friend is his thing. So is the thing. Hello? Oh, hello. Ah. [inaudible] the pan a plate to in this glass we can go to things was no, no real, no key when the photograph do here. Your laugh. But you know [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] this guy.

Speaker 5: 03:49 Whoa.

Speaker 4: 04:13 [inaudible].

Speaker 2: 04:21 That was Rebecca jade in the cold fact performing their new song. Nothing left for us. And that is from their upcoming album running out of time. The musicians are Rebecca jade on the vocals. Al Howard on percussion, Jake nature on drums, Jason Littlefield on Bass, Daniel Shreyer on keys and Ian Owen on guitar. How you guys doing today? Wonderful. Fabulous. We appreciate you being here. Rebecca. I'll start with you. You've had a busy couple of years, just got San Diego Music Award, best jazz album for your album, planet Cole Porter with Guitars, Peter Sprague, uh, you play in sirens crush and several other groups. How did you learn to be such a versatile singer? I would probably say a lot of is my upbringing. My mom is a singer and a, so she exposed me to lots of different styles of music. Jazz was probably my first influence. She also exposed me to Patty labelle and Michael McDonald and three dog night and Chaka Khan and Roberta flack.

Speaker 2: 05:18 So it varied from rock and soul and R and B. And so I just kind of adapted those styles to me as much as I could. It's like this, the music we grew up on, right? Yes, absolutely. Yeah. And, and you've been for the last couple of years touring with Sheila e, correct? Yes. What's most memorable from, from that experience? Everything. Every moment. I'm just soaking up how it's done in the big leagues and she's been at it since she was 15 she started touring when she was 15 and she was going to be 62 this year. So that just goes to show. She has lots of experience. So it's been, it's been an incredible journey and I'm just trying to soak it up, learn and try to incorporate anything I can from that experience. Our you, you not only perform percussion over there, you also write a lot of lyrics and music.

Speaker 2: 06:06 What draws you to this type of music? Oh, I'd say the same thing. My mom, I got my record collection started from my mom, sort of, I can use the term borrowing, but I guess I took her records, you know, when she had tons of great old soul. And a jazz, everything now I moved out here, I got a job at a record store and I just hear different music every day and I want to find my way to impact music. But I'm not a singer like Rebecca is and you know. But I could write lyrics. So that was me finding my voice and he writes amazing lyrics. I wanted to ask you about that, cause you ride a lot of lyrics but how do you take them and make them your own? Rebecca? I just try to make them my own story somehow. You know, I envision it put myself in a story to make it my own. If I'm doing my job as a songwriter, it shouldn't sound like it's someone else's lyrics when she's singing them and these are her songs and that's what they sound like when I hear them. And before you guys get out of dodge, you're going to play us out with, I only smoke when I drink. Thanks so much for coming in you guys. Thank you so much.

Speaker 3: 07:12 [inaudible]

Speaker 4: 07:27 it's still a picture of it. So the y, it's just a number and a name since like the last one, not the bedroom.

Speaker 3: 07:57 [inaudible]

Speaker 4: 08:11 it's just memory. Ben. We learn to strip away. What's the cost of Mondex? What's the price of all this back? [inaudible] better route. Not the fall. Maybe it's solely Healy. We put on, it's too wavy. We have to stop [inaudible] [inaudible]

Speaker 3: 10:24 stay [inaudible]

Speaker 4: 11:20 [inaudible]

Speaker 3: 11:27 [inaudible]

Speaker 6: 11:49 that was Rebecca jade and the cold fact to hear more and see a of their performance.

Speaker 1: 11:54 Go to kpbs.org/summer music series, Rebecca jade and the cold fact. We'll hold an album release party and perform at the Casbah on September 13th there's a link on our website and our summer music series continues next Thursday with a performance by the San Diego family rockabilly band. The see monks.

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KPBS Midday Edition Segments

Maureen Cavanaugh and Jade Hindmon host KPBS Midday Edition, a daily radio news magazine keeping San Diego in the know on everything from politics to the arts.