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Arts & Culture

NOVA scienceNOW: What Makes Us Human? (New Season Premiere)

David Pogue, host of NOVA scienceNOW, watches a ray swim overhead at the Georgia Aquarium.
Courtesy of Katie Bauer
David Pogue, host of NOVA scienceNOW, watches a ray swim overhead at the Georgia Aquarium.

Airs Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 10 p.m. on KPBS TV

David Pogue, popular technology reporter for The New York Times, is the new host of the critically acclaimed science magazine series, NOVA scienceNOW, beginning with the launch of Season Six in October 2012. Featuring four stories in each themed episode, the new season again tackles an array of thought-provoking topics.

Who's Who In Human Evolution

Meet your distant cousins in this interactive illustration of the past seven million years.

"What Makes Us Human?" - Scientists have struggled for centuries to pinpoint the qualities that separate human beings from the millions of other animals who have evolved on this planet.

In this episode, David Pogue explores the traits we once thought were uniquely ours — language, tool-making, even laughter — to uncover their evolutionary roots.

He traces some of the crucial steps that transformed cave men to accountants — and learns how much of his own DNA came from a Neanderthal ancestor.

NOVA is on Facebook, and you can follow @novapbs on Twitter. Follow @Pogue on Twitter.

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Watch What Makes Us Human? Preview on PBS. See more from NOVA scienceNOW.

Scientists have struggled for centuries to pinpoint the qualities that separate human beings from the millions of other animals who have evolved on this planet. In this episode, David Pogue explores the traits we once thought were uniquely ours — language, tool-making, even laughter — to uncover their evolutionary roots. He traces some of the crucial steps that transformed cave men to accountants — and learns how much of his own DNA came from a Neanderthal ancestor.