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New Sweetwater Superintendent Will Make $225,000

Photo credit: San Diego County Office of Education

Sweetwater Interim Superintendent Tim Glover

Tim Glover, who this month became interim superintendent at Sweetwater Unified High School District, will make $25,000 less a year than his predecessor.

The interim superintendent hired this month to head the Sweetwater Union High School District will make $225,000 a year under a contract the school board members are expected to ratify Thursday.

The board hired Tim Glover on July 2, and he started work on July 7 but without a contract. One was signed last Thursday and it shows he will make $27,000 less a year than his predecessor, Ed Brand. The contract runs through next March, or until the board picks a permanent superintendent.

Glover is on unpaid leave from his assistant superintendent position with the San Diego County Office of Education while he serves as Sweetwater’s interim superintendent. His leave ends Dec. 31.

By then, the five-member Sweetwater school board will have all new trustees. Board President John McCann’s term is up at the end of the year, and he is running for Chula Vista City Council. The other four school trustees are serving on a temporary basis for board members who were convicted in a pay-to-play scheme with contractors who did business with the district.

So, in November, voters in the Sweetwater district will elect five new school board members who can decide whether to keep Glover or choose someone else.

Glover is a Castle Park High School graduate who has held several jobs in the Sweetwater district, including teacher and assistant principal.

The Sweetwater school district has been mired in controversy since the trustees were indicted in 2012 by the county District Attorney’s Office. Also indicted was then-Superintendent Jesus Gandara, who was sentenced last month to 220 days in jail and three years of probation for his role in pay-to-play scheme.

Brand, who came out of retirement in 2011 to replace Gandara, had planned to retire in October but the school board abruptly placed him on paid leave through October. That decision came two days before Glover was chosen to succeed him.

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