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Roundtable: San Diego Revives Vehicle Habitation Ban

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San Diego City Council approves a limited ban on people living in their vehicles, homeless deaths increase by more than 50% in San Diego, and asylum seekers, who are forced to "remain in Mexico," struggle to make it to their court hearings in the United States.

Aired: May 17, 2019 | Transcript

Vehicle habitation update

After a few short months, San Diego City Council revived a limited ban on residents living in their vehicles. Under the new law, people are not allowed to sleep in their cars from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., or at any time within 500 feet of homes and schools. If caught disobeying the ordinance, local police will redirect residents to multiple “safe parking places” around the city before issuing a ticket. The ban has stirred much debate over the last couple of years. Critics claim it criminalizes those who are unable to afford San Diego’s housing prices. However, supporters say since the ordinance was overturned, city streets have been overwhelmed with homeless people who are causing safety concerns coupled with cleanliness issues.

RELATED: San Diego Bans Homeless From Living, Sleeping In Vehicles

Homeless deaths on the rise

The number of local homeless people dying on the streets is on the rise. That’s according to the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office, which reports an increase of deaths by more than 50% in the last ten years. KPBS Roundtable takes a look at what's causing the problem, and what solutions are being considered.

Asylum seekers face long journey to court

President Trump’s “Remain in Mexico” policy continues. The latest issue is over asylum seekers who are waiting south of the border and who are finding it difficult to make it to their court hearings in the United States. Some have a journey of more than 100 miles to reach the San Ysidro Port of Entry. The San Diego Union-Tribune takes a first-hand look at the obstacles asylum seekers face while going through the process.

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