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Arts & Culture

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Raleigh, North Carolina - Hour Two

At "Antiques Roadshow" in Raleigh, North Carolina, this guest is delighted to learn that his watercolor painting is an original piece, called the “Trammel,” by noted realist painter Andrew Wyeth. Bought in 1985, the painting has greatly appreciated over the last few decades — appraiser Nan Chisholm assigns the piece a realistic insurance value of $450,000.
Jeff Dunn for ANTIQUES ROADSHOW
At "Antiques Roadshow" in Raleigh, North Carolina, this guest is delighted to learn that his watercolor painting is an original piece, called the “Trammel,” by noted realist painter Andrew Wyeth. Bought in 1985, the painting has greatly appreciated over the last few decades — appraiser Nan Chisholm assigns the piece a realistic insurance value of $450,000.

Airs Monday, October 6, 2014 at 9 p.m. on KPBS TV

Specialists from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers from across the nation travel throughout the United States offering free appraisals of antiques and collectibles. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW cameras watch as owners recount tales of family heirlooms, yard sale bargains and long-neglected items salvaged from attics and basements, while experts reveal the fascinating truths about these finds. Mark L. Walberg hosts.

Behind the Scenes in Raleigh

View photos from ROADSHOW'S visit to Raleigh, North Carolina on Saturday, June 27, 2009.

SLIDESHOW: What Was Behind the Wyeth Watercolor?

Check out what the owner found when he took the cover off the back of "The Trammel"!

"Raleigh" (Hour Two) - ROADSHOW visits the North Carolina Museum of History with appraiser J. Michael Flanigan to look at the work of Thomas Day, a free man of color who became the most famous North Carolina furniture maker of the 19th century.

Highlights include a circa 1800 eastern North Carolina bottle case on stand; an 1812 needlework sampler; and a 1985 Andrew Wyeth watercolor, whose owner benefited from a tug-of-war between art dealers, valued at $450,000.

Miss last week's show? Catch up on your appraisal watching in the ROADSHOW Archive. Search by city, episode, season, and more! ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is on Facebook, Pinterest, and you can follow @RoadshowPBS on Twitter.