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AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Eyes On The Prize: Ain’t Scared Of Your Jails/ No Easy Walk

Airs Thursday, April 8, 2010 at 9 p.m. on KPBS TV

Above: On August 28, 1963, America witnesses an unprecedented spectacle as 250,000 blacks and whites march side by side in Washington, DC, in the largest demonstration the country had ever seen.

"Eyes on the Prize" is an award-winning 14-hour television series produced by Blackside and narrated by Julian Bond. Through contemporary interviews and historical footage, the series covers all of the major events of the civil rights movement from 1954-1985.

L-R: College students Matthew Walker, Peggy Alexander, Diane Nash and Stanley Hemphill eat lunch in Nashville's Greyhound Bus terminal, marking the first time that African Americans were served at previously segregated counters.
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Above: L-R: College students Matthew Walker, Peggy Alexander, Diane Nash and Stanley Hemphill eat lunch in Nashville's Greyhound Bus terminal, marking the first time that African Americans were served at previously segregated counters.

Series topics range from the Montgomery bus boycott in 1954 to the Voting Rights Act in 1965; from community power in schools to "Black Power" in the streets; from early acts of individual courage through to the flowering of a mass movement and its eventual split into factions.

Episode Three: "Eyes on the Prize: Ain't Scared Of Your Jails 1960-1961"

Black college students take a leadership role in the civil rights movement as lunch counter sit-ins spread across the South. "Freedom Riders" also try to desegregate interstate buses, but they are brutally attacked as they travel.

In May 1963, firefighters turn their hoses full force on young civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama, shocking the American public and turning the world's attention to the struggle.
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Above: In May 1963, firefighters turn their hoses full force on young civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama, shocking the American public and turning the world's attention to the struggle.

Episode Four: "Eyes on the Prize: No Easy Walk 1961-1963"

The civil rights movement discovers the power of mass demonstrations as the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. emerges as its most visible leader. Some demonstrations succeed; others fail. But the triumphant March on Washington, DC, under King's leadership, shows a mounting national support for civil rights. President John F. Kennedy proposes the Civil Rights Act.

Reflections on an Era:

Read personal essays and other comments from a variety of people connected with the Civil Rights Movement. Then share your own thoughts or comments.

Video

Promo: American Experience: Eyes On The Prize

Above: Actor and author Bill Cosby discusses the important lessons to be learned from the groundbreaking civil rights series "Eyes On The Prize" and encourages everyone to watch it when it returns to their local PBS station in April 2010.

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