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Southeast San Diego Musicians 'Reclaim The Community'

Vocalist Wilnesha Sutton, also known as Tru7h, in this undated photo.
Sarah Loud
Vocalist Wilnesha Sutton, also known as Tru7h, in this undated photo.
New Southeast San Diego Rap Album: Reclaiming the Community
Southeast San Diego Musicians 'Reclaim The Community'
Southeast San Diego Musicians ‘Reclaim The Community’ GUESTS: Parker Edison, executive producer, "Reclaiming the Community" Brandon "Tiny Doo" Duncan, rap artist, "Reclaiming the Community" Willnisha "Tru7h" Sutton, vocalist, "Reclaiming the Community"
Rappers Aye Hit, Tiny Doo, King Louie, Von Dreaam and Paper Chase in this undated photo.
Sarah Loud
Rappers Aye Hit, Tiny Doo, King Louie, Von Dreaam and Paper Chase in this undated photo.

Going beyond a reputation of gang violence, rap artists with strong ties to southeastern San Diego are taking back the neighborhood with a new album called “Reclaiming the Community.”

The album features 32 artists, spearheaded by executive producer Parker Edison. Edison said the artists are from different parts of San Diego but are all connected.

“Each person has the same problems, but they are kind of giving their takes,” Edison told KPBS Midday Edition on Tuesday. “It’s a vast variety.”

Brandon “Tiny Doo” Duncan, who made headlines after charges were filed against him under a conspiracy law that allows for the prosecution of gang members if they promote crimes, said the album allows artists to create their own narrative. The charges were dismissed by a San Diego Superior Court judge in March.

“I just want to change the narrative of what’s going on with the Police Department,” Duncan said. “We want to paint the picture.”

Duncan said his contribution to the album allows him to share a different view of his neighborhood.

“We have a bad stigma on Southeast San Diego but there’s a lot of love there,” Duncan said.

“They say the Bloods and the Crips don’t get along. It’s not like that. There’s people who make music every day.”

Edison echoed Duncan’s comments about the neighbhorhood having a negative reputation.

"People have a negative, or narrow view of Southeast," Edison said. "The media focuses on the violence, but there's so much more to it. This is a way for us to stand up and do something — to grab a hold of our community.”

On a broader level, artist Wilnisha "Tru7h” Sutton said it allowed different people to come together.

“It was good to see all of us come together for the greater cause,” Sutton said.

The CD will be available at a few record shops in San Diego, and directly from the artists featured on the album.