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PBS NEWSHOUR Election Night Coverage 2016

Airs Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 at 5 p.m. on KPBS TV

PBS NEWSHOUR co-anchors and managing editors Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill.

Credit: Courtesy of WETA/ PBS

Above: PBS NEWSHOUR co-anchors and managing editors Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill.

Watch live coverage of election results, co-anchored by managing editors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff.

2016 Campaign Connection

Your roundup of the 2016 Presidential Campaign from PBS, NPR and across public media. Connecting you to in-depth reporting and analysis on the candidates and the issues this election year.

KPBS News Live Election Special Report

Then tune into KPBS News' special live election coverage at 11 p.m. (simulcast on 89.5 FM). Visit KPBS.org/election for the latest election news and results.

PBS NEWSHOUR managing editors Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff co-anchor live coverage of election results.

NEWSHOUR correspondents John Yang will report on location from the Clinton campaign headquarters in New York and Jeffrey Brown from the Trump campaign headquarters in New York, and senior correspondent and PBS NEWSHOUR WEEKEND anchor Hari Sreenivasan will report in studio in Washington, D.C.

NEWSHOUR’s panel of studio guests includes New York Times columnist New York Times columnist David Brooks; syndicated columnist Mark Shields; Cook Political Report’s Amy Walter; Emory University’s Director of the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference Andra Gillespie; Mitt Romney’s 2012 campaign chief strategist Stuart Stevens; and 2008 and 2012 Obama campaign pollster Cornell Belcher.

NEWSHOUR correspondent Lisa Desjardins will report on down ballot initiatives with Nathan Gonzalez, editor and publisher of The Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report, with additional reporting from presidential historian Michael Beschloss, PBS NEWSHOUR WEEKEND special correspondent Jeff Greenfield from WNET; and correspondent William Brangham and digital politics editor Daniel Bush from the newsroom.

The live coverage on television will begin at 5 p.m. and continue throughout the evening until 11 p.m. In addition to broadcast on PBS stations nationwide, NEWSHOUR’s special will stream on Facebook, Youtube, and Ustream.

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Coverage extends online and on social beginning at 8 a.m. on Election Day.

You can follow @thenewshour on Twitter and PBS NEWSHOUR is on Tumblr.

KPBS is on Facebook, Instagram, and you can follow @KPBSnews on Twitter.

Photo credit: Courtesy of PBS

Logo for PBS' 2016 Election Coverage

This year’s big ballot initiatives to watch

There are more than 150 ballot initiatives this year at the state level, capable of creating huge change for voters. Nine states are voting on the legalization of recreational or medical marijuana. Other measures concern gun control, the minimum wage and the death penalty. John Yang learns more from John Myers of the Los Angeles Times and Josh Altic of Ballotpedia for more.

How Americans with disabilities see this election

Unlike in past presidential contests, disability is something both campaigns have addressed this cycle, if sometimes inadvertently. More than 35 million Americans with disabilities will be eligible to vote, making up almost one-sixth of the electorate. Judy Woodruff gets views from both Clinton and Trump supporters on how they’re voting.

California ballot revives debate on bilingual education

On Nov. 8, California voters will vote on a proposition that would make it easier for school districts to expand bilingual education. Critics say English-only instruction is crucial to assimilation, while supporters argue that it would be an opportunity to embrace the state’s multiculturalism and linguistic richness. Special correspondent Kavitha Cardoza of Education Week reports.

Why congressional races matter this year

Regardless of who wins the presidential election on Nov. 8, the party that controls the balance of power in the U.S. House and Senate will play a crucial role in determining what gets done. Judy Woodruff speaks with Norman Ornstein of the American Enterprise Institute and Gerald Seib of The Wall Street Journal.

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