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Roundtable: Funding The Affordable Housing Crisis

Construction crews work on a 24-unit apartment building in North Park, July 2...

Photo by Andrew Bowen

Above: Construction crews work on a 24-unit apartment building in North Park, July 23, 2019.

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San Diego moves to ease the city's affordable housing crisis. As climate change continues, ice is melting in the north and homeowners are having a tough time protecting their properties from damage.

Aired: August 2, 2019 | Transcript

Roundtable Guests:

Andrew Bowen , reporter, KPBS News

Erik Anderson, reporter, KPBS News

Michael Smolens, columnist, San Diego Union-Tribune

Affordable housing

The shortage of affordable housing in San Diego is an ongoing challenge. From financing to construction, the city continues working toward the goal of getting people off the streets and into a stable living environment they can afford. This week San Diego City Council took action on two proposals: an update to its “inclusionary housing” policy that makes developers pay more to support low-income housing, and a $900 million affordable housing bond proposed for the 2020 ballot. It could create more than 7,000 homes for financially struggling residents. However, the funding would come at a price — an increase in property taxes.

Global warming

Recent studies suggest Global Warming may start speeding up if the Arctic Ice Caps begin melting at a faster rate. Large masses of ice in the North Pole are shrinking, which is decreasing the amount of heat reflected away from the earth. The reduction of reflective ice means more carbon dioxide is being absorbed into Earth’s oceans. This, in conjunction with Europe’s recent record-breaking heat wave, has experts concerned the melting will be expedited.

RELATED: Europe’s heat wave is about to bake the Arctic

Homeowners insurance

Global Warming isn’t only affecting our temperatures, it’s increasing the cost of homeowners insurance. Residents living in fire-prone areas are not the only property owners bearing the financial burden. Due to risks of erosion and flooding from rising sea levels, coastal homes are slowly becoming subject to insurance issues.

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