Skip to main content

San Diego Young People Rally To Bring Attention To Climate Change

In this Dec. 4, 2018, file photo, birds fly past a smoking chimney in Ludwigs...

Photo by Michael Probst / AP

Above: In this Dec. 4, 2018, file photo, birds fly past a smoking chimney in Ludwigshafen, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019.

Dozens of San Diego high school students will gather Saturday for the region’s first youth climate action summit.

Aisha Wallace-Palomares, 17, helped put the first ever Youth Climate Action Summit together. She wants to energize young people so they will encourage policymakers to take action.

“Although we did not create the problem, we stand to lose the most from it. And so I want to organize my peers to take action because I don’t want to be the only voice,” Wallace-Palomares said.

Participants will get briefings on the current state of the planet’s climate and it will include workshops to give participants plans for action.

RELATED: Protesters Target Rep. Davis For Green New Deal In San Diego

Organizers want young people to influence what’s happening at the national, state and local level.

“I go to my city council meetings. I started having a relationship with my council members to just show them how much of a vested interest I have in this issue. So that they, then, know that their constituents care about it and that they need to take action on it,” Wallace-Palomares said.

The meeting will feature a talk by Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a globally known climate scientist from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

By Reporter Erik Anderson

Dozens of San Diego high school students will gather Saturday for the region’s first youth climate action summit.

You can hear this story and other local news every morning by subscribing to San Diego News Matters, KPBS’ daily news podcast. Subscribe via iTunes, Google Play or your favorite podcatcher.

Want more KPBS news?
Find us on Twitter and Facebook, or sign up for our newsletters.

To view PDF documents, Download Acrobat Reader.