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Arts & Culture

Cinema Junkie Episode 184: Filmmaker Trey Edward Shults

Filmmaker Trey Edward Shults on the set of his 2017 film "It Comes At Night."
A24
Filmmaker Trey Edward Shults on the set of his 2017 film "It Comes At Night."

Revisiting Shult's 2017 film 'It Comes At Night' as his new film 'Waves' opens

At a time when much of Hollywood's award hopefuls feel familiar in their storytelling formula, it's refreshing to find films like "Waves" and the upcoming "A Hidden Life" from Terrence Malick that speak in an audaciously cinematic language that is pure visual poetry. "Waves'" filmmaker Trey Edward Shults grabbed my attention two years ago for "It Comes At Night," an unconventional horror film that was poorly served by its misleading ad campaign. I had the opportunity to speak to Shults back in 2017 when "It Comes At Night" opened. With his new film in theaters I thought it would be fun to revisit his interview.

Trey Edward Shults has a new film in theaters, "Waves," but I became aware of him in 2017 when he released "It Comes at Night." So from the archives, here is my interview with Shults from 2017.

At a time when much of Hollywood's award hopefuls feel familiar in their storytelling formula, it's refreshing to find films like Shults' "Waves" that speaks in an audaciously cinematic language that is pure visual poetry.

I fell in love with Shults when I saw "It Comes At Night, an unconventional horror film that created an atmosphere of palpable dread. But it was also a story about complex family dynamics and about coping with grief and loss. Those are themes that you will find in Shults' first film "Krisha" and his new film "Waves."

"Waves" looks to an upper middle-class south Florida family that is thrown into turmoil when the life of their star-athlete teenage son takes a tragic turn.

In my 2017 interview with Shults we talk about making films that challenge expectations, about dealing with misleading ad campaigns, and about turning personal trauma into art.