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Politics

San Diego Iranians Cautiously Optimistic About Nuclear Deal

Mohammad Ghaffarian, an Iranian refugee in San Diego, shares his ideas about the nuclear deal with Iran, July 14, 2015.
Katie Schoolov
Mohammad Ghaffarian, an Iranian refugee in San Diego, shares his ideas about the nuclear deal with Iran, July 14, 2015.

San Diego Iranians expressed mixed emotions about Tuesday’s nuclear agreement, which lifts economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for nuclear activity limits.

Some local Iranians were optimistic about what the deal would mean for their families and friends in Iran.

Mohammad Ghaffarian, a 27-year-old Iranian refugee who arrived in San Diego seven months ago, said he expects the deal will decrease the cost of living for his parents in Iran.

“It will be very awesome to see that our families are in better life conditions,” he said.

Ghaffarian said he thinks the agreement will improve relations between the U.S. and Iran.

“This is the start of a new era,” he said. “I think this is a very positive step toward friendship.”

Bardia Khanbolooki, an 18-year-old student who came to San Diego from Iran more than two years ago, said he thinks the agreement will make it easier for him to see friends he left behind in Iran.

“If the relations get better, it could be easier for them to move here, you know? And I could get to see them again,” he said.

Farnav Ghasemian, a 35-year-old Iranian refugee who came to San Diego in 2011, said she is happy about the deal because her diabetic father in Iran will have access to better healthcare options.

“If they need medicine, they can import it from the U.S. now,” she said of her parents.

Ghasemian said she thinks people in Iran are still suffering injustices the deal does not address.

“Even though this is a great time and most Iranians are celebrating, the Baha'i minority are still not being treated in a humane way in Iran,” she said.

The deal still has to be approved by Congress. North County Congressman Darrel Issa called it a “bad deal” on his Twitter feed.