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Reporter's Deep Dive Finds A Broken Immigration System

Angelica Lopez holds the hand of daughter, Ashley, and son, Osmar, as they and other immigrants and deportees approach the Otay Mesa Port of Entry where some plan to ask for asylum, March 10, 2014, Tijuana, Mexico.
Jill Replogle
Angelica Lopez holds the hand of daughter, Ashley, and son, Osmar, as they and other immigrants and deportees approach the Otay Mesa Port of Entry where some plan to ask for asylum, March 10, 2014, Tijuana, Mexico.
The U.S. Immigration system has big problems, and there is no aspect as problematic as the way the U.S. grants — or doesn't grant — asylum.

In her four years covering immigration for The San Diego Union-Tribune, reporter Kate Morrissey has seen great anguish and despair.

She has documented not only the politics that surround immigration, but the ravages of COVID-19 in the Otay Mesa Detention Center, the plight of Cameroonians deported back to their home country, and the fate of young people hoping for a renewal of the DACA program.

Her latest in-depth report examines how the U.S. asylum system, meant to offer immigrants facing repression and even death at home a place of safety on this side of the border, is broken nearly to the point of non-existence.

Morrissey talked with KPBS Midday Edition's Maureen Cavanaugh about how a re-imagining of asylum might work.