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ANTIQUES ROADSHOW: Eugene, Ore. - Hour Two

Airs Monday, February 3, 2014 at 9 p.m. on KPBS TV

Above: In Eugene, Oregon, this guest brings in an early 20th century Russian presentation sword from the reign of Tsar Nicholas II, purchased for $500. Appraiser Mark Schaffer values the enamel over silver sword, set with diamonds, and engraved with the Cyrillic monogram of the Tsar, between $75,000 and $100,000.

Specialists from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers from across the nation travel throughout the United States offering free appraisals of antiques and collectibles. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW cameras watch as owners recount tales of family heirlooms, yard sale bargains and long-neglected items salvaged from attics and basements, while experts reveal the fascinating truths about these finds. Mark L. Walberg hosts.

Behind the Scenes in Eugene, Oregon

View photos from ROADSHOW'S visit to Eugene on Saturday, June 4, 2011.

"Eugene, Ore." (Hour Two) - In Eugene, Oregon, host Mark L. Walberg joins appraiser Jeffrey Schrader at the Willamette Heritage Center at the Mill, site of the former Thomas Kay Woolen Mill, to discuss the history and current values of World War I uniforms.

Highlights include: a circa 1800 New England Chippendale chest-on-chest; an 1846 map of Western America; and an early 20th-century Russian presentation sword from the reign of Tsar Nicholas II, purchased by the owner for $500, and valued between $75,000 and $100,000.

Miss last week's show? Catch up on your appraisal watching in the ROADSHOW Archive. Search by city, episode, season, and more! ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is on Facebook, and you can follow @RoadshowPBS on Twitter.

Video

Antiques Roadshow: Jeweled Caucasian Presentation Sword

Above: In a preview from Eugene, Hour Two, Mark Schaffer examines an ornate Russian sword encrusted with diamonds and inscribed with the monogram of Nicolas II — details so fine and rare that Schaffer believes it might even have come from the last Czar's personal collection.