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GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET: Madama Butterfly

Airs Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016 at Noon on KPBS TV

Kristine Opolais as Cio-Cio-San and Roberto Alagna as Pinkerton in Puccini's ...

Credit: Courtesy of Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Above: Kristine Opolais as Cio-Cio-San and Roberto Alagna as Pinkerton in Puccini's "Madama Butterfly."

The late Anthony Minghella’s critically acclaimed production of Puccini’s classic “Madama Butterfly” comes to GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET on PBS.

Kristine Opolais brings her heartbreaking interpretation of the title role to the series for the first time. Roberto Alagna sings Lieutenant Pinkerton, the callous officer who crushes Butterfly's dreams of love.

Debuting conductor Karel Mark Chichon leads a cast that also includes Maria Zifchak as Suzuki and Dwayne Croft as Sharpless.

Tenor Matthew Polenzani hosts the broadcast.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Kristine Opolais as Cio-Cio-San and Roberto Alagna as Pinkerton in Puccini's "Madama Butterfly."

The opera is based in part on the 1898 short story "Madame Butterfly" by John Luther Long, which had its genesis in Pierre Loti’s 1887 French novel "Madame Chrysanthème."

Long's version was dramatized by David Belasco as the extremely popular one-act play, "Madame Butterfly: A Tragedy of Japan," which premiered in 1900 in New York. Puccini first saw it London later that year.

The opera had its World premiere at Teatro alla Scala in Milan in 1904, and premiered at the Met on Feb. 11, 1907.

That year, Giacomo Puccini came to the United States for the first time for the Met premiere of "Madama Butterfly." Geraldine Farrar sang the title role, and her 139 appearances in this opera remain a Met record.

While in New York, Puccini attended a Broadway performance of Belasco’s play "The Girl of the Golden West," which would become the basis for his next opera.

The title character of "Madama Butterfly" — a young Japanese geisha who clings to the belief that her arrangement with a visiting American naval officer is a loving and permanent marriage — is one of the defining roles in opera.

The story triggers ideas about cultural and sexual imperialism for people far removed from the opera house, and film, Broadway, and popular culture in general have continue to riff endlessly on it.

The lyric beauty of Puccini’s score, especially the music for the thoroughly believable lead role, has made "Butterfly" timeless.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Cio-Cio-San's child (Blind Summit Theatre), Kristine Opolais as Cio-Cio-San and Maria Zifchak as Suzuki in Puccini's "Madama Butterfly."

Giacomo Puccini (1858–1924) was immensely popular in his own lifetime, and his mature works remain staples in the repertory of most of the world’s opera companies.

His librettists for "Madama Butterfly," Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica, had also collaborated with the composer on his previous two operas, "Tosca" and "La Bohème." Giacosa, a dramatist, was responsible for the stories and Illica, a poet, worked primarily on the words themselves.

Puccini achieved a new level of sophistication with his use of the orchestra in this score, with subtle colorings and sonorities throughout.

But the opera rests squarely on the performer of the title role: on stage for most of the time, Cio-Cio-San is the only character that experiences true (and tragic) development.

The singer must convey a complex array of emotions and characteristics, from ethereal to fleshly to intelligent to dreamy-bordering-on-insane, to resigned in the final scene.

The opera takes place in the Japanese port city of Nagasaki at the turn of the last century, at a time of expanding American international presence.

Japan was hesitantly defining its global role, and Nagasaki was one of the country’s few ports open to foreign ships. Temporary marriages for foreign sailors were not unusual.

Photo credit: Courtesy of Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Roberto Alagna as Pinkerton in Puccini’s “Madama Butterfly.”

REVIEWS:

Reviewing the present production, The New York Times raved, "Ms. Opolais's voluptuous, expressive voice soared over Puccini's dense orchestration, and there were riveting moments in her portrayal.”

The New York Observer noted, "This jewel of understated direction and sleekly minimal design ennobles the familiar narrative, elevating the melodramatic story of a Japanese child bride abandoned by her American husband to a poignant tragedy…” and praised Opolais as “a bold artist, the kind of singer who makes attending the opera a transformative pleasure."

New York Classical Review opined, "[Kristine Opolais] had a tremendous partner in Alagna, who was at his absolute best as Pinkerton, unleashing his signature bright power and focus…His singing was a thrill to hear, and his characterization of the American Lieutenant was intricately layered.”

Great Performances at the Met: Madama Butterfly

Kristine Opolais brings her heartbreaking interpretation of the title role to the series for the first time. Roberto Alagna sings Lieutenant Pinkerton, the callous officer who crushes Butterfly's dreams of love. Debuting conductor Karel Mark Chichon leads a cast that includes Maria Zifchak as Suzuki and Dwayne Croft as Sharpless.

Patricia Racette in Puccini's Madama Butterfly

Patricia Racette performed the role of Cio-Cio-San in the 2009 Met production of Puccini's tragic love story opera, Madama Butterfly. Racette sings the heartbreaking aria of hope, “Un bel dì vedremo,” in this excerpt. Deborah Voigt hosts Encores! Great Performances at the Met, featuring 19 arias and duets, airing in December 2014 on PBS stations (check local listings).

Past episodes of GREAT PERFORMANCES are available for viewing on demand for a limited time after each broadcast.

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CREDITS:

GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET is a presentation of THIRTEEN Productions LLC for WNET, one of America’s most prolific and respected public media providers. For the Met, Gary Halvorson directs the telecast. Jay David Saks is music producer. Mia Bongiovanni and Elena Park are supervising producers, and Louisa Briccetti and Victoria Warivonchik are producers. Peter Gelb is executive producer. For GREAT PERFORMANCES, Bill O’Donnell is series producer; David Horn is executive producer.

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