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Monica Montgomery Discusses Win, Future On The San Diego City Council

Democrat Monica Montgomery, who was elected to the San Diego City Council, sp...

Photo by Megan Wood / inewsource

Above: Democrat Monica Montgomery, who was elected to the San Diego City Council, speaks to her supporters at the Hotel Republic in downtown San Diego on Nov. 6, 2018.

Monica Montgomery Discusses Win, Future On The San Diego City Council

GUEST:

Monica Montgomery, San Diego city councilmember-elect

Transcript

The biggest upset victory in the city of San Diego this Tuesday was the election of Democrat and civil rights attorney Monica Montgomery in District 4. The district includes the neighborhoods of Oak Park, Encanto and Paradise Hills.

With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, unofficial election results show Montgomery received 56 percent of the vote, 44 percent went to Cole.

The results weren't a total surprise since Montgomery pulled in a few more votes than her opponent, Democratic incumbent Myrtle Cole in the June Primary. But ousting an incumbent and Council President is a rare accomplishment.

“This is amazing what the community, what the district, what the people have done. We just unseated an incumbent, a council President backed by the Labor Council, backed by Republicans, backed by the entire Democratic Party, District 4 is amazing for doing this,” Montgomery said.

RELATED: City Council President Cole Losing Fight To Keep Her Seat In District 4

Republican incumbent City Councilwoman Lori Zapf also lost her re-election bid in district 2 to Democrat Jennifer Campbell giving the Democrats a veto-proof majority on the council.

No incumbent San Diego city councilmember has lost re-election since 1992.

Montgomery says she would like to see the new Democratic majority push for a local hire provision and criminal justice reform.

She also said she stands by her pledge to not retain any of Cole's staff members, including Cole's chief of staff who has served in that capacity for District 4 for more than a decade.

“My comments have been clear about that. There has been a sense in the office that the community doesn’t deserve the resources that everyone else gets. That is something that comes from the top down. We need new ideas. We need folks that have a mentality that has compassion for our community and will fight for our community,” she said.

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