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Poway’s Measure P, Which Would Rebuild Schools, Falling Short

Rancho Bernardo High School on Jan. 8, 2019.

Photo by Joe Hong

Above: Rancho Bernardo High School on Jan. 8, 2019.

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UPDATE: 7:12 a.m., March 4, 2020

With 350,000 ballots still to be counted countywide, Measure P, which asks Poway voters to approve a $448 million bond measure that would help Poway Unified School District rebuild its facilities, is so far failing.

The measure needs 55% of the votes in Tuesday's election to pass. It has 47.4% in the latest returns Wednesday morning.

Original story

Voters in Poway are deciding whether to approve a $448 million bond measure that would help Poway Unified School District rebuild its aging facilities.

If passed, Measure P would cost property owners about $34 annually for every $100,000 of assessed property value. The measure needs 55% of the votes in Tuesday's primary to pass.

The ballot measure comes more than 10 years after what has come to be known as the billion-dollar bond, a $105-million measure that with delayed payments and accruing interest, ended up costing property owners $1 billion.

But Superintendent Marian Kim Phelps has said there’s a completely new leadership team in the district. She’s convinced that the bond measure will pass considering the amount of outreach her team has done about the need for renovations at the district’s schools.

The San Diego County Taxpayer’s Association endorsed the bond, citing the district’s detailed plan. But the Association cautioned taxpayers to consider the already existing bond before submitting their ballots.

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Photo of Joe Hong

Joe Hong
Education Reporter

opening quote marksclosing quote marksAs an education reporter, I'm always looking for stories about learning. My favorite education stories put a student's face on bigger policy issues. I regularly sift through enrollment data, test scores and school budgets, but telling student-centered stories is my top priority.

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