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Ric Ocasek, Frontman Of The Cars, Has Died

Sept. 15
Anastasia Tsioulcas / NPR

The lead singer of The Cars — the offbeat Boston rock band that became a mainstay of radio in the 1980s — died Sunday afternoon in Manhattan.

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Iran Denies It Is Behind Drone Attacks On Oil Plants In Saudi Arabia

Sept. 15
Shannon Van Sant / NPR

Houthi rebels in Yemen have claimed responsibility for the attacks, but Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused Iran of launching an "unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply."

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UAW Goes On Strike Against General Motors

Sept. 15
Bobby Allyn / NPR

Picket lines began forming outside GM plantst after United Auto Workers voted on Sunday to begin a strike at midnight. Nearly 50,000 workers are affected by the work stoppage.

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'We Don't Want To Die': Women In Turkey Decry Rise In Violence And Killings

Sept. 15
Joanna Kakissis / NPR

"Domestic violence never happens because there's a problem with the woman. The men are killing. They are the problem," says a rights activist in Istanbul.

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PHOTOS: Vanilla Boom Is Making People Crazy Rich — And Jittery — In Madagascar

Sept. 15
Wendell Steavenson / NPR

The price of vanilla is 10 times higher than a few years ago. That's bringing unimagined wealth to local villages — and problems as well.

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'We're Tightening Our Belt': Trump's Midwest Support Tested As Farmers Struggle

Sept. 15
Clay Masters / NPR

Farmers in the rural Midwest say they are hurting because of President Trump's ongoing trade war and a recent decision on renewable fuels.

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Judge Blocks Removal Of Confederate Statue That Sparked Charlottesville Protest

Sept. 14
Shannon Van Sant / NPR

An effort to remove the statue of Robert E. Lee sparked the white nationalist rally in 2017 that resulted in the deaths of counter-demonstrator Heather Heyer and two state police officers.

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Houthi Drone Strikes Disrupt Almost Half Of Saudi Oil Exports

Sept. 14
Alexander Tuerk / NPR

The attacks on oil facilities by the Iran-backed Yemeni rebels sent large plumes of smoke into the air, the trails visible from space, and impacted an estimated production of 5 million barrels a day.

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MoviePass Has Officially Shut Down, And We Don't Know If There Will Be A Sequel

Sept. 14
Jenny Gathright / NPR

The service announced Friday that it would be suspending service for an undefined amount of time.

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Osama Bin Laden's Son Killed In U.S. Counterterrorism Operation, Trump Says

Sept. 14
Shannon Van Sant / NPR

Hamza bin Laden was killed in the Afghanistan/Pakistan region, according to a statment by the president on Saturday. He said his death "undermines important operational activities" of al-Qaida.

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British Authorities Scramble To Find Stolen Solid Gold Toilet

Sept. 14
Jenny Gathright / NPR

Titled America, it is a work of art by Italian Maurizio Cattelan that had been installed at England's Blenheim Palace. A 66-year-old man has been taken into custody.

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Mugabe's State Funeral Proceeds, But His Burial Plan Has Been Mired In Controversy

Sept. 14
Jenny Gathright / NPR

Zimbabwe's longtime president Robert Mugabe was honored with a state funeral on Saturday — put on by the president and military leaders who had forced him out of office just two years ago.

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Alaska Villages Run Dry And Residents Worry About A 'Future Of No Water'

Sept. 14
Renee Gross / NPR

The remote community of Nanwalek on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula is accessible only by boat or seaplane. Now, it's running out of water because of a lack of rainfall and low snowpack.

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Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

Sept. 14
Sarah Jane Tribble / NPR

State regulators and even one medevac company have raised doubts about prepaid subscriptions and promised benefits offered by air ambulance companies. Gaps in coverage can be a problem.

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Democrats Get Closer To Serious Field Of Trump Challengers

Sept. 14
Ron Elving / NPR

Something happened this week that was hard to pin down, but it was palpable. Not the contrast of night and day, but perhaps the difference between dusk and dawn.

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Missouri AG Refers 12 Ex-Priests For Prosecution Of Suspected Sexual Abuse

Sept. 13
Richard Gonzales / NPR

An investigation that looked back to 1945 identified 163 cases of abuse. However, many of the alleged offenders are now dead or the statute of limitations on their alleged crimes has passed.

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Cinema Junkie Podcast 178: 'Steam Room Stories: The Movie'

Sept. 13
By Beth Accomando

FilmOut San Diego hosts a screening of "Steam Room Stories: The Movie" on Sept. 18 as part of its ongoing film series. JC Calciano will be at the screening and I talk with him about making a film in Cinema Scent, going from YouTube to feature film, and working with Traci Lords.

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Bahamian Government Revises Number Of Missing After Dorian Down To 1,300

Sept. 13
Vanessa Romo / NPR

"The number of people registered missing with the Bahamas government is going down daily," a spokesman for NEMA told reporters, adding that many could be unaccounted for in shelters.

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Cinder The Orphaned Otter Makes It To SeaWorld San Diego And Is 'Otterly' Cute

Sept. 13
By Shalina Chatlani

Cinder, a 5-week old orphaned northern sea otter, was abandoned in Alaska, but now she's being rehabilitated at an otter nursery at SeaWorld.

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Bill To Ban Private Lockups Would Impact Immigrant Detention In San Diego

Sept. 13
By Max Rivlin-Nadler

A new bill passed by the state legislature on Wednesday bans the use of private prisons and detention centers in California. For San Diego that could mean finding a different place to keep more than a thousand detained migrants.

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