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Roundtable: Money For Misconduct Records

Roundtable: Money For Misconduct Records

PANEL:

Matthew T. Hall, editorial/opinion director, The San Diego Union-Tribune

J. Harry Jones, reporter, The San Diego Union-Tribune

Maya Srikrishnan, reporter, Voice of San Diego

Claire Trageser, reporter, KPBS

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Transcript

Sheriff’s department relents on cost for misconduct records

This week, the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department began releasing some of its records on deputy misconduct investigations. In recent days, the department decided to reverse its plan to charge KPBS hundreds of thousands of dollars for the information. Last month, a new state law took effect that requires more disclosure of misconduct cases. The law’s implementation is being challenged by several police unions.

RELATED: San Diego County Police Unions Sue Over New State Transparency Law

ICE using DMV records to help with arrests

Recent arrests by ICE include instances in which officers had DMV information on immigrants, including copies of their driver licenses. Local Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez tells Voice of San Diego she has submitted a formal inquiry to learn more about how the DMV is sharing information. Several state laws address data privacy in ways that are intended to protect undocumented immigrants.

RELATED: For 7th Consecutive Year, Visa Overstays Exceeded Illegal Border Crossings

Local tribes and marijuana

East County’s Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel is the first local Native American reservation to get into the marijuana business. The operation is housed inside an old casino that closed in 2014. The venture opens up potential conflicts with county government, which has banned marijuana sales. The Iipay Nation’s entry into the market could serve as a potential model for other local reservations that are looking for ways to grow their economies.

RELATED: A Look Back At The First Year Of Legal Marijuana Sales In California

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