Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Arts & Culture

Provocative Public Art Graces San Diego Waterfront

Our silences on display in Brussels, on May 21, 2010.  the statues now live along the San Diego waterfront near Seaport Village.
Our silences on display in Brussels, on May 21, 2010. the statues now live along the San Diego waterfront near Seaport Village.
Provocative Public Art Graces San Diego Waterfront
An international public art project lands on the San Diego waterfront. The tall bronze sculptures aim to provoke discussions about freedom of expression.

San Diego's waterfront is home to a collection of large bronze monoliths for the next couple of months.

Mexican artist Rivelino brought the installation back into the public eye after being off exhibit for two years. The artist said world events prompted him to bring the sculptures back in front of the public.

"Each country suffers different levels of repression," said Rivelino through a translator. "Or censorship or self censorship, and depending on where and when it is being shown it makes you think of those different topics."

Rivelino said the attack on freedom of speech in France makes the installation contemporary, and every country has to deal with it.

The 10 imposing statues now stand in the park next to Tuna Harbor in downtown San Diego. There's a large square braille box that lets those with poor vision, get a sense of the art.

The Port of San Diego welcomed the Mexico government's request to display the work here.

"An art-installation of world wide significance with real content, is really important. Because it's something for people to learn about, get excited about. And come down and draw more people down to the tidelands," said Rafael Castellanos, a Port of San Diego commissioner.

Five million people have seen this installation as it was displayed around the world. This is the first time its been on exhibit in the U.S. and it will remain in San Diego until March.