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Lightsabers, Han Solo Dazzle Comic-Con San Diego Fans

Photo caption: Artist Hugo Crosthwaite is pictured painting the mural "Child's Play" at the ...

Photo credit: Neil Kendricks

Artist Hugo Crosthwaite is pictured painting the mural "Child's Play" at the San Diego State University Downtown Gallery in this undated photo.

GUESTS:

Beth Accomando, arts reporter, KPBS

Neil Kendricks, filmmaker, "Comics are Everywhere"

Transcript

The parties are over, the celebrities have cleared out, and the superheroes have packed up their capes. Another Comic-Con has come to a close.

Photo caption: "The Moving Hand" mural by Richard Tackett is pictured at the San Diego State...

Photo credit: Neil Kendricks

"The Moving Hand" mural by Richard Tackett is pictured at the San Diego State University Downtown Gallery in this undated photo.

Photo caption: San Diego Comic-Con's exclusive cover for Kaiju Max, a new comic by Zander Ca...

Photo credit: Oni Press

San Diego Comic-Con's exclusive cover for Kaiju Max, a new comic by Zander Cannon and published by Oni Press, is pictured in this undated photo.

Comic-Con International San Diego wrapped up Sunday but the more than 100,000 people who attended the four-day event downtown haven’t stopped reflecting on the highlights of this year’s pop culture extravaganza.

Friday’s panel for "Star Wars Episode VII — The Force Awakens," which comes out in December, was one of the biggest highlights of the convention for many people. Fans were treated to a conversation with Kathleen Kennedy, head of Lucas Films, director J.J. Abrams, and key members of the new cast. The stars of the original “Stars Wars” movies, Carrie Fisher, Mark Hamill and Harrison Ford, also showed up.

After the panel, more than 6,000 fans were invited to a surprise concert performed by the San Diego Symphony that featured “Star Wars” music.

For San Diego filmmaker, Neil Kendricks, a lawmaker was the highlight of the annual convention.

Democratic Rep. John Lewis of Georgia had a book signing for his memoir, “March.” The three-part graphic novel tells about his role in the civil rights movement.

“He was the only real superhero in the house,” Kendricks told KPBS Midday Edition on Monday. “He authentically connected to people.”

But Comic-Con was more than just the panelists and the booths. Kendricks said the attendees make Comic-Con what it is.

“Why this is so special — it’s the people sharing their passion,” he said.

The parties are over, the celebrities have cleared out, and the superheroes have packed up their capes. Another Comic-Con has come to a close.

An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the name of the mural Artist Hugo Crosthwaite is pictured painting.

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