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Quaker Organization Marks 100 Years Of ‘Waging Peace’

Quaker Organization Marks 100 Years Of ‘Waging Peace’

GUESTS:

Pedro Rios, director, American Friends Service Committee U.S.-Mexico Border Program in San Diego

Linda Caballero Sotelo, executive director, New Americans Museum

Transcript

Photo credit: New Americans Museum

A logo of the exhibit "Waging Peace: 100 years of action."

The American Friends Service Committee is best known in San Diego as an immigrants-rights organization.

It has worked to advocate for migrants who say their rights and lives have been endangered by U.S. government policies and against the militarization of the U.S.-Mexico border. But AFSC has a broader mission and a longer history.

AFSC is a Quaker organization and it's been working for peace and nonviolence for just over a century.

The group is marking its centennial with a traveling exhibit called, “Waging Peace: 100 years of action.” The exhibit is now on display at the New Americans Museum in Liberty Station.

Pedro Rios, director of AFSC's U.S.-Mexico Border Program in San Diego and Linda Caballero Sotelo, executive director of the New Americans Museum, talk about the history of AFSC and the timing of the exhibit, Thursday on Midday Edition.

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