Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Almost An Island

Elmer Goodwin and his sons fishing
Courtesy of Vision Maker Media / American Public Television
Elmer Goodwin and his sons fishing. An Inupiat family living above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska.

Premieres Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021 at 11 p.m. on KPBS TV

“Almost An Island” is a cinematic portrait of the Goodwins, an Inupiat family living above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska. Through observing three generations of one family over four years, the documentary explores what it means to be indigenous in the dramatically changing Arctic.

Almost An Island: Preview

Elmer Goodwin, 78, grew up in a sod house wearing animal skins. Now, his dog sled has transformed into a snow machine. His children are half white, but Elmer wants to teach his family everything he knows about being Inupiat.

Ice fishing
Courtesy of Vision Maker Media / American Public Television
Ice fishing. “Almost An Island” is a cinematic portrait of the Goodwins, an Inupiat family living above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska.

"Almost An Island" is an intimate portrayal of this multi-generational family, revealing their memories, dreams and goals, and challenging common stereotypes to show the Goodwins as complex, dignified individuals.

William and Carrie Longley
Courtesy of Vision Maker Media / American Public Television
William and Carrie Longley. “Almost An Island” is a cinematic portrait of the Goodwins, an Inupiat family living above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska.

"Almost An Island" is on Facebook

Presented by Vision Maker Media and distributed by American Public Television. Director, Cinematographer, Co-editor: Jonathan VanBallenberghe. Producer: Sharon Wahl. Co-editor: Jacob Bricca, A.C.E. Executive Producer: Victoria Westover.

Elmer Goodwin smoking salmon
Courtesy of Vision Maker Media / American Public Television
Elmer Goodwin smoking salmon. “Almost An Island” is a cinematic portrait of the Goodwins, an Inupiat family living above the Arctic Circle in Kotzebue, Alaska.