Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Tijuana-based band Junipero
Courtesy of the artist
Tijuana-based band Junípero in an undated photo.

5 songs to discover in San Diego in October

Speaker 1: (00:00)

This month, we're celebrating Hispanic heritage month in our five songs, music picks. We all spotlight five musicians and bands in the region who are either performing this month or just released new music. There's a broad range of styles coming out of the Latin X music scene in our region. And joining us to walk us through the playlist is KPBS arts editor and producer Julia Dickson Evans. Welcome

Speaker 2: (00:24)

Julia. Hi Marine

Speaker 1: (00:26)

And midday edition producer Harrison Pitino. Hi Harrison.

Speaker 3: (00:31)

Hello, Maureen. Good to be here.

Speaker 1: (00:33)

So let's start with Julia. Your first pick is stars by two, one, a band who need borough. Let's take a listen

Speaker 4: (00:40)

[inaudible].

Speaker 2: (00:56)

So who NEPA is an Indy dream pop band. They're based in Tijuana and it's a duo, but they'll perform at the full band sometimes. And their sound is just super earnest full of layered melodies and vintage guitar sounds kind of has a beach house vibe to me may put out a five track EPE self-titled last April, and it is absolutely gorgeous. And from the CPS standout track for me is this one stars it's sweet and hopeful, but a little bit tragic too. I love the line. Stars will guide you back to my arms. Definitely checks all the boxes for me, rich songwriting, and a really lush and dreamy sound

Speaker 4: (01:38)

[inaudible]

Speaker 2: (01:47)

And they also recently released a live session on YouTube. That is absolutely worth a listen. They play a beautiful version of stars on that too. And their social media posts suggests that they are recording new music right now, too.

Speaker 1: (02:01)

That's stars by one, a dream pop duo who need borough up next. We have the Logan Heights based surf punk trio beach, goons, and Harrison. You said there's a melancholy to the energy of this band.

Speaker 3: (02:15)

Yeah, that's right. Marine. So beach goons is the brainchild of Publix Avantis. Who's been the group sole members since the band's inception, their early work consisted of a lot of lo-fi rough around the edges garage rock, but as sense mellowed out and matured a little bit, which isn't to say that their newer tracks don't still have that same frenetic energy of their earlier work.

Speaker 4: (02:37)

[inaudible]

Speaker 3: (02:48)

Their music still retains the fast pace and jangly guitar accompaniment that we see in a lot of surf punk today, but also has this distinct mournfulness and introspection from a songwriting. The band performed songs in both English and Spanish. And on the Spanish side, I really like attract from there delicately named 2018 album hood rat scumbags. It's on the softer side of the repertoire, and it really captures these themes of sadness and youthful disillusionment that runs through a lot of their music. Here's the track shouldn't they

Speaker 4: (03:20)

[inaudible]

Speaker 1: (03:33)

That's Trinity by Logan Heights, very own beach goons, who you can see live at the observatory on October 7th and out this week, a new remix of Latin pop artists, Gabby Aparicio song, cortisone remixed by nine theory. Julia, tell us about Gabby Aparicio and the story of this track.

Speaker 2: (03:53)

Yeah, so it's a brand new remix of a 2019 track. So Gabby Aparicio is a pretty hardworking performer. It seems like she's constantly performing shows around town. Her family is from Uruguay and she was raised in Florida moving to San Diego about seven years ago and she was nominated for a 20, 20 San Diego music award for album Labella Vieta for the best world music category. And I really enjoyed that album. It really shows off her range, the sounds, the seamless mix of Latin influence and pop structures. And her voice is fantastic. She sings this track Corazon in Spanish, but she does sing some of her music in English to

Speaker 5: (04:38)

[inaudible] further to slash [inaudible] [inaudible].

Speaker 2: (04:59)

So Corazon was on that 2019 album and this remix gives it a pretty chill house or electronic spin. This is producer named theory, who, who worked on the remix and it just dropped a few days ago. I really like how true to the original, this remixes. It maintains a lot of the delicacy and the quiet groove, but just ramps it up a bit. And Gavi has a bunch of performances in town this month, including as part of little Italy. Artwalk that's this Sunday at 11:00 AM for her performance.

Speaker 1: (05:49)

Okay. We've been listening to the nine theory remix of Gabby Aparicio is cortisone Harrison moving to a mainstay of San Diego's Latin music scene. Tell us about the San Diego Latin jazz collective.

Speaker 3: (06:04)

Well, Maureen, as you can probably imagine the San Diego Latin jazz collective deals in you guessed it Latin jazz, although it's kind of not really easy to capture what you can expect from a typical show with just those two words. The genre itself is steeped in so many different music styles and traditions from Samba to bossa Nova. And a lot of its DNA comes from the music of Cuba and Brazil That said it's hard to overstate, just how great Latin jazz sounds in person cacophonous horn sections combined with driving rhythm and percussive elements make live, shows a must see the San Diego Latin jazz collected performs really lively renditions of the classics of the genre that are so popular for a reason. Here's their addition to the Sancho bono classic. John John,

Speaker 1: (07:06)

John, John, by the San Diego Latin jazz collective, who can be seen live every Thursday tonight included at tin roof in the Gaslamp. And finally, Ramona MES squat known as Bostitch from the legendary electronic music group. Nortech collective will perform a DJ set as part of the front galleries, 15 year anniversary celebration in October and along with singer Ruben Elberon they produced a track in 2020 Julia. Tell us about these artists and about convince on may.

Speaker 2: (07:41)

Yeah, let's start with Ramon, Ms. CRA, otherwise known as busty beach this spring. He was featured in a special port of entry podcast. One of our moved by music episodes and he explored how he was on track to becoming a dentist until finally moving into being one of the most influential players in the, in the Mexico on border region, electronic music worlds, and as Nortech collective, they got to Latin Grammy nominations for their album, Tijuana sessions, volume three, that was in 2008. And they've recently been putting out a string of singles, including this one, convinced them a with vocalist Ruben Albarran convinced him a is lively with their really textured combination of folk, Sonic undertones, and then some really fuzzy beats and lyrics that feel almost haunting kind of playful, but a little dark edge tingle

Speaker 6: (08:41)

[inaudible] [inaudible]

Speaker 1: (08:49)

And Julia, you can see Nortech collective at the front gallery in San Ysidro on October 16th. Tell us a little bit about that.

Speaker 2: (08:57)

Yeah. The front is celebrating their 15th anniversary with a bunch of programming throughout October. It all revolves around a special exhibition that takes place that opens October 7th, but definitely get the 16th on your calendar for this Nortek DJ set. Tickets are free, but they're limited to just 50 people. And the RSVP list opens up on October 1st at 10:00 AM. And this will be a chance to check out the art and hear some great music too.

Speaker 4: (09:27)

[inaudible]

Speaker 1: (09:43)

And we've been listening to Nortex convince a may. You can find a playlist of all these tracks on our website. I've been speaking with KPBS arts editor and producer, Julia Dickson Evans and midday edition producer Harrison Pitino. Thank you both so much.

Speaker 2: (10:00)

Thank you, Marine exploring.

Speaker 6: (10:04)

Oh yeah.

Speaker 4: (10:09)

[inaudible]

Speaker 6: (10:47)

[inaudible]

Speaker 4: (11:03)

[inaudible].

In our "5 Songs" segment for Hispanic Heritage Month, we turn to the broad range of music styles from the region's Hispanic and Latinx performers, featuring bands who will perform this month or have recently released new music — Junípero, Beach Goons, Gaby Aparicio, the San Diego Latin Jazz Collective and Nortec Collective: Bostich and Fussible with Rubén Albarrán.

KPBS Midday Edition producer Harrison Patino joined me this month to curate the playlist.

RELATED: Hispanic, Latino, Latinx — A Question Of Belonging

Junípero: 'Stars'

Junípero is an indie dream-pop band, based in Tijuana. Their sound is earnest, full of layered melodies and vintage guitar that brings to mind bands like Beach House. They put out a five-track, self-titled EP last April, and it's absolutely gorgeous. A standout track for me is "Stars." It's sweet and hopeful, full of rich songwriting and a lush, dreamy sound — but a little tragic and obsessive too. I love the line, "Stars will guide you back to my arms."

Earlier this year Junípero released a series of live sessions on YouTube that are also worth a listen, recorded at Silvestre Café in Tijuana — including a beautiful version of "Stars." I'm hopeful we'll see a full-length album from them soon. --JDE

Junípero live @SilvestreCoffee

Beach Goons: 'Chunti'

Logan Heights-based surf punk trio Beach Goons is the brainchild of Pablo Cervantez, who’s been the group’s sole member since the band’s inception. Their early work consisted of a lot of lo-fi, rough-around-the-edges garage rock but has since mellowed out and matured a little bit — which isn’t to say their newer tracks don’t still have the same frenetic energy of their earlier work.

Their music still retains the fast pace and jangly guitar accompaniment that we see in a lot of surf punk today, but also has this distinct mournfulness and introspection from a songwriting perspective. The band performs songs in both English and Spanish, and on the Spanish side I really like a track from their delicately named 2018 album, "Hoodratscumbags." "Chunti" is on the softer side of their repertoire, and it really captures these themes of sadness and youthful disillusionment that runs through a lot of their music.

You can catch Beach Goons at The Observatory on Oct. 7, 2021. — HP

Gaby Aparicio
Sharisse Coulter
Musician Gaby Aparicio in an undated photo.

Gaby Aparicio: 'Corazón (9 Theory Remix)'

Out this week, a new remix of a 2019 Gaby Aparicio track. Aparicio, whose family is from Uruguay, was raised in Florida before moving to San Diego seven years ago. She's a steadfast performer, constantly playing shows in town, and was nominated for a 2020 San Diego Music Award for her album, "La Bella Vita." The album really showed off her impressive range. Her sound is a seamless mix of Latin influence and pop structures, and her vocals are fantastic — powerful while still nimble and graceful.

"Corazón" is in Spanish, though some of her work is sung in English. This new remix from producer 9 Theory adds a chill, house spin with subtle electronic touches. I like how true to the original this remix is, maintaining a lot of the delicacy and quiet groove, but ramping it up just a bit.

Aparicio has a bunch of performances in town this month, including as part of Little Italy Art Walk — this Sunday, Oct. 3 at 11 a.m. --JDE

San Diego Latin Jazz Collective: 'Chan-Chan'

The San Diego Latin Jazz Collective is a mainstay in San Diego's Latin jazz scene — a genre steeped in many different musical styles and traditions from samba to bossa nova, and a lot of its DNA comes from the music of Cuba and Brazil.

That said, it's hard to overstate just how great Latin jazz sounds in person: cacophonous horn sections combined with driving rhythm and percussive elements make live shows a must see. The San Diego Latin Jazz Collective performs really lively renditions of the classics of the genre — these tunes are popular for good reason — like their take on the son cubano classic “Chan-Chan.”

Listen here.

The San Diego Latin Jazz Collective can be seen live every Thursday at Tin Roof in the Gaslamp. --HP

Nortec: Bostich + Fussible
Courtesy of the artist
Nortec: Bostich + Fussible in an undated photo.

Nortec: Bostich + Fussible Feat. Rubén Albarrán: 'Convénceme'

This spring we featured Ramon Amezcua, known as Bostich, in a special "Moved by Music" episode of our Port of Entry podcast which explored how he was on track to becoming a dentist until finally becoming one of the most influential players in the Mexican and electronic music worlds. Nortec Collective saw two Latin Grammy nominations for their album "Tijuana Sessions, Vol. 3." in 2008. And, along with frequent Nortec collaborator Fussible, Bostich has recently been putting out a string of singles, including "Convénceme," with vocalist Rubén Albarrán. Albarrán also recently collaborated with The Color Forty Nine and artist Hugo Crosthwaite on the beautiful stop motion music video, "What Would I Know / ¿Yo Que Sé?"

RELATED: Hugo Crosthwaite: A Life In (Stop) Motion

"Convénceme" is a lively, borderline rowdy track, with a textured combination of folk undertones, fuzzy beats and lyrics that feel almost taunting — playful, but a little dark-edged too.

Convénceme Feat. Rubén Albarrán - Nortec: Bostich + Fussible

Nortec: Bostich + Fussible will perform as part of San Ysidro-based arts space The Front Arte & Cultura's 15th anniversary celebration on Oct. 16th.

Beginning Oct. 7, their special anniversary exhibition, "El Devenir / Becoming" will be on view through early January. The exhibition features art by Marcos Ramirez ERRE, Rafael Lozano Hemmer, Tania Candiani, Rizzhel Javier and Sama Alshaibi, and the Nortec performance will be a great opportunity to see the work and take in some music, too. Tickets for the Oct. 16th performance are free, but reservations are required and limited to just 50 people due to space restrictions. The RSVP list opens Friday, Oct. 1. --JDE

You can find a partial playlist of these selections on Spotify here. Follow KPBS on Spotify for more monthly playlists.

What are you listening to this month? Join the conversation in the KPBS/Arts Facebook Group.

Julia Dixon Evans writes the KPBS Arts newsletter, produces and edits the KPBS/Arts Calendar and works with the KPBS team to cover San Diego's diverse arts scene. Previously, Julia wrote the weekly Culture Report for Voice of San Diego and has reported on arts, culture, books, music, television, dining, the outdoors and more for The A.V. Club, Literary Hub and San Diego CityBeat. She studied literature at UCSD (where she was an oboist in the La Jolla Symphony), and is a published novelist and short fiction writer. She is the founder of Last Exit, a local reading series and literary journal, and she won the 2019 National Magazine Award for Fiction. Julia lives with her family in North Park and loves trail running, vegan tacos and live music.
Harrison Patiño is a producer for "KPBS Midday Edition". His primary roles include story development, and is involved in the audio production and coordination of interview subjects. Prior to joining KPBS, Harrison held various positions at Hawaii Public Radio within its news and music departments. While pursuing a double major in journalism and classics at The University of Hawaii at Manoa, Harrison worked at the school's student-run radio station, KTUH. After graduating, Harrison served as a community advisor for the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Student Media Board.