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Politics

Chargers Open Training Camp With Public Practice

People watch as the Chargers practice during their first day of training camp, July 30, 2015.
Steve Walsh
People watch as the Chargers practice during their first day of training camp, July 30, 2015.

Chargers Open Training Camp With Public Practice
The public practice opened Thursday as there is doubt whether or not the Chargers will stay in San Diego. The team has acquired land in Carson, in Los Angeles County, on which they could build a facility — perhaps in concert with the Oakland Raiders.

There was cautious optimism from both the team and its fans, as the Chargers began the first day of what could be the final season in San Diego.

This was the first time Crystal Herrera of San Diego had been to Chargers Park and she was hoping it wouldn’t be the last.

“Obviously, everyone wants them to stay here," Herrera said. "That’s personally, what I want, but whatever happens happens. I’ll always follow them.”

Parking and admission to all training camp practices at Chargers Park are free.

During the week, parking is available only on Murphy Canyon Road. For weekend practices, fans will be allowed to park on Murphy Canyon Road or in the Kearny Mesa Business Center just south of Chargers Park.

Bleacher seating will be available. Fans are welcome to bring folding chairs to sit on the pavement surrounding the practice fields. Fans also may bring food, water and soft drinks. Cigarettes and alcoholic beverages are not allowed at Chargers Park at any time.

Hot and cold food, snacks, bottled water and soft drinks will be available for purchase. The Chargers Team Store will have a mobile location selling the latest team merchandise and apparel.

The Charger Girls will make special appearances during training camp practices.

Fans may bring personal cameras, but video cameras and telephoto lenses longer than six inches — detachable or non-detachable — are not allowed.

Other items not permitted at Chargers Park during training camp include pets (other than service dogs), weapons, chains, stun guns, mace and pepper spray, water guns, fireworks, Frisbees, sports balls, beach balls or other inflatable objects, laser pointers, flammable objects, musical instruments or noise-making devices.

After Thursday, the Chargers will have eight other practices at Chargers Park open to the general public:

— Friday, 2:50 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

— Saturday, 9:20 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

— Sunday, 2:50 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

— Wednesday 2:50 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

— Aug. 10, 2:50 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

— Aug. 15, 9:20 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

— Aug. 17, 2:50 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.

— Aug. 18, 9:20 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

The gates at Chargers Park will open one hour before the start of each practice.

The Chargers will hold their annual FanFest at Qualcomm Stadium Aug. 8, when the team will practice from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The Chargers have been asking for a new stadium for nearly 15 years and have acquired land in Carson, in Los Angeles County, on which they could build a facility — perhaps in concert with the Oakland Raiders.

An environmental impact report is being prepared for a proposed stadium in Mission Valley. The first draft of the report is due to be released for public comment on Aug. 10, San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer said.

The plan is to get the document approved by the City Council in October so the public can vote on a stadium measure in January.

However, the Chargers walked away from talks with the city and county of San Diego in a dispute over the faster environmental study. Mark Fabiani, the Chargers' spokesman on stadium issues, said an expedited EIR won't be legally defensible.

In order to meet the city/county timeline, an agreement on terms for a stadium deal will be needed by mid-September.

San Diego officials are scheduled to make a presentation to NFL team owners on Aug. 10.