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Pandemic Thanksgiving Advice For First-Time Cooks

Editor's note: During the interview, our guest said defrosted cooked turkey bones are poisonous. They are not. We regret the error.

A spatchcocked turkey is pictured in an undated photo.

Credit: Caron Golden

Above: A spatchcocked turkey is pictured in an undated photo.

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Americans are devising all sorts of imaginative ways to spend the Thanksgiving holiday. Some are planning to use technology to bring family together virtually. But it’s left many people with ... Read more →

Aired: November 16, 2020 | Transcript

This will be a Thanksgiving like no other for many people. The spike in COVID-19 infections across the country means the usual travel and family gatherings will not be happening.

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Americans are devising all sorts of imaginative ways to spend the Thanksgiving holiday. Some are planning to use technology to bring family together virtually. But it’s left many people with the realization that if they want a home-cooked Thanksgiving dinner, they’re going to have to make it themselves, and some for the first time in their lives.

San Diego freelance food writer Caron Golden joined Midday Edition on Monday with some first turkey tips and advice on how to plan your Thanksgiving meal.

RELATED: A College Student Is Coming Home. Should The Whole Family Wear Masks?

Below is Golden's recipe for the "Easiest, Crispiest Skin Roasted Turkey for the Holidays" from her blog, San Diego Food Stuff.

Spatchcocking is a way of breaking down the bird so it will rest flat in a roasting pan and cook evenly. You avoid the age-old problem of having the white meat dry out while the dark meat continues to cook below. Instead, you have moist meat from the drumstick to the breast. And because it roasts at high heat, the turkey cooks quickly and the skin all over the turkey is fully exposed, making it all nice and crisp. But heads up--it really only works well with turkeys 14 pounds and smaller so it will fit in a roasting pan.

Here's how you do it. Place the turkey on a cutting board and pull out whatever may be in the cavity (neck, giblets), trim any excess fat, and drain the bird of any liquid. Pat it down with paper towels so it's as dry as possible. Using a very good pair of kitchen shears, cut the bird from one end to the other along the backbone. Most people cut the backbone out entirely but I like to keep it and roast it too. When you've done that open up the bird skin side up with the breast facing you. Place the heel of one hand over the breast bone and your other hand over the first. Bear down on the breast until you feel and hear a crack. That would be the breast bone. Now your turkey can rest flat on the pan, which is where it should now go.

Pre-heat a conventional oven to 450° F.

I season my bird lightly with garlic salt and paprika. Then I rub in olive oil (you can also use butter) and squeeze fresh lemon juice all over before tucking the remaining lemon halves under the bird. You can also add slices of onion and fresh herbs.

Put the turkey in the oven and let it roast for about an hour and 20 minutes. Don't baste it.

At 1 hour, 20 minutes, pull the turkey out of the oven and measure its temperature with a meat thermometer to test if it's done. The breast should hit 150° and the thigh should be 165°. If you've hit that, turn off the oven and lightly tent the turkey (if not, put the turkey back in the oven and try again in five minutes). Let it rest at least 20 minutes before carving.

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