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Public Safety

Another Heat Wave Bears Down On San Diego County

The sun beams down on a hillside near Lake Murray in San Diego, March 24, 2015.
Susan Murphy
The sun beams down on a hillside near Lake Murray in San Diego, March 24, 2015.

Another Heat Wave Bears Down On San Diego County
The second heat wave to hit the region in two weeks could send temperatures in the valleys soaring once again to triple digits.

A strengthening high-pressure system over Southern California is pushing San Diego County into the grips of another heat wave, with hot and muggy temperatures expected to continue through Saturday.

The event won’t be quite as extreme as two weeks ago, but it will still feel hot, said Alex Tardy, meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

Thursday and Friday will be the most uncomfortable days, Tardy said.

“Escondido and El Cajon getting up right around 100,” Tardy said. “On the beaches, getting into the low to mid-80s. And as you go just inland between the I-15 and I-5 corridor, temperatures getting in the lower 90s.”

This color-coded map shows San Diego in red for its above average risk of wildfires.
Fire Predictive Services
This color-coded map shows San Diego in red for its above average risk of wildfires.

Meanwhile, residual monsoonal moisture in the mountains and deserts, combined with soaring temperatures, could drive thunderstorms to develop on Wednesday afternoon and evening, warned a bulletin from the National Weather Service. A flash flood watch is in effect through 8 p.m. on Wednesday.

A cool-down throughout the county will begin on Sunday, Tardy said. But warm and dry conditions, with an increased fire risk, could persist through September and into October.

Tardy said the first tangible signs of El Niño and the first rains will be a waiting game.

“Unfortunately El Niño doesn’t get rid of Santa Ana winds," Tardy said. “We are quite dry —record breaking dry with the four-year drought — but even with a wet July, we’re going to be really sensitive come this fall."