Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Environment

Something Rare Visits San Diego County — Rain

A man fills bags with sand from La Jolla Shores as the San Diego area braces for an approaching storm, Dec. 2, 2014.
Gregory Bull / Associated Press
A man fills bags with sand from La Jolla Shores as the San Diego area braces for an approaching storm, Dec. 2, 2014.

Rainfall Totals

Here are the National Weather Service rainfall figures for San Diego County as of 4 p.m. Tuesday:

Palomar Mountain: 0.52 of an inch

Mount Laguna: 0.21 of an inch

Fallbrook: 0.20 of an inch

Julian: 0.18 of an inch

Vista: 0.16 of an inch

Valley Center: 0.13 of an inch

Carlsbad: 0.10 of an inch

Descanso: 0.10 of an inch

Mount Woodson: 0.09 of an inch

Campo: 0.08 of an inch

Rancho Bernardo: 0.06 of an inch

Santee: 0.06 of an inch

Alpine: 0.05 of an inch

Ramona: 0.05 of an inch

Rancho San Diego: 0.05 of an inch

Potrero: 0.05 of an inch

Chula Vista: 0.02 of an inch

Miramar: 0.02 of an inch

Poway: 0.02 of an inch

Lindbergh Field: 0.02 of an inch

Source: City News Service

A cool autumn storm delivered some all-too-rare rainfall to the San Diego area Tuesday.

From early morning to late afternoon, the dark clouds shed as much as half of an inch of moisture in the East County, according to the National Weather Service. Inland valley and coastal areas saw a quarter of an inch or considerably less over the same period.

As evening approached, however, heavier rains were beginning to move into the county.

Through Monday, only a little more than 3 inches of rain had been measured at Lindbergh Field since Jan. 1.

With total precipitation from the unsettled system projected to range from 2 to 4 inches in the mountains and 1 to 2.5 inches west to the ocean, the National Weather Service issued a flash-flood watch effective through 9 a.m. Wednesday. The highest risk was expected to center around steep mountain slopes and recent burn areas.

No significant rain-related problems had been reported by early evening.

Property owners concerned about flooding were offered up to 10 free sandbags each from the San Diego Fire-Rescue Department. The sacks — which must be filled by recipients, using beach sand if so desired — were being distributed at lifeguard stations at La Jolla Shores, Mission Beach, Ocean Beach and Pacific Beach, and at city fire stations in Ocean Beach, the Midway District, Pacific Beach, Kearny Mesa, San Ysidro, Rancho Bernardo, Scripps Ranch, Tierrasanta, Rancho Peñasquitos, Santaluz and Pacific Highlands.

County officials, meanwhile, made free bags and sand available at fire stations in Bonita, Dulzura, Fallbrook, Julian, Ramona and Valley Center. People were asked to bring their own shovels to fill the sacks.

A lone surfer makes his way into the water as storm clouds come ashore in San Diego, Dec. 2, 2014.
Gregory Bull / Associated Press
A lone surfer makes his way into the water as storm clouds come ashore in San Diego, Dec. 2, 2014.

What questions do you have about the Statewide General Election coming up on Nov. 8? Submit your questions here, and we'll try to answer them in our reporting.