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LA County's Human Relations Commission's New Approach To Documenting Hate Crimes

Chinese-Japanese American student Kara Chu, 18, holds a pair of heart balloons decorated by herself for the rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence outside the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, March 13, 2021.
AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes
Chinese-Japanese American student Kara Chu, 18, holds a pair of heart balloons decorated by herself for the rally "Love Our Communities: Build Collective Power" to raise awareness of anti-Asian violence outside the Japanese American National Museum in Little Tokyo in Los Angeles, March 13, 2021.
For many people in the Asian American Pacific Islander community, fear about the pandemic has been compounded by anti-Asian hate. Today SDSU’s Department of Sociology and Center for Community Research and Engagement will hold a talk on Acts of Hate, Immigration and the Pandemic.

For many people in the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, fear about the pandemic has been compounded by incidences of hate crimes.

Today, SDSU’s Department of Sociology and Center for Community Research and Engagement will hold a talk exploring the connection between Acts of Hate, Immigration and the Pandemic.

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The event will feature Robin Toma, the executive director of the Human Relations Commission in Los Angeles.

Toma joined Midday Edition on Tuesday to discuss the commission's new system for victims to report hate crimes and get help.

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