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California Legislators Suspend Requirements of Public Meeting Law

California legislators have suspended some of the requirements of the Brown Act to help close the budget gap.

Aired 7/12/12 on KPBS News.

California legislators have suspended some of the requirements of the Brown Act to help close the budget gap.

That state law requires California counties, cities, school districts and other local agencies to post agendas for the public and disclose decisions made in closed meetings.

The state usually pays for those expenses, but the budget adopted last month suspends those provisions for three years to save the state $96 million dollars. Jim Ewert with the California Newspaper Publishers Association said he’s very concerned with the move.

“For those agencies that decide that they want to cut their own costs or they want to cut their own corners," said Ewert, "they can do so and a citizen would have no legal recourse to call them on it.”

Some municipalities and governing boards may continue to follow the law regardless of the suspension. But a spokeswoman with The League of California Cities said the group has not decided what it will recommend to cities.

Comments

Avatar for user 'GandT'

GandT | July 14, 2012 at 5:23 p.m. ― 2 years, 1 month ago

Wow, are you kidding me? Can they do actually do this? Really?

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Avatar for user 'SDCountyFF_PM'

SDCountyFF_PM | July 18, 2012 at 10:35 p.m. ― 2 years, 1 month ago

How much could it possibly cost to publish them on their website then twitter the notice of the posting or allow interested parties to subscribe to updates? Just because they want to save money on printing and publishing notices/minutes, etc. doesn't mean that they can get away with giving no notice whatsoever. This is the 21st Century, last I checked, zeroes and ones are pretty cheap and most of us have given up pen and paper and gone digital already.
But heck, just think of how much suspending Habeas Corpus or Due Process would save? Is this not the slippery slope?

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