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Presidential Candidate Supporting A 'Green' New Deal Program

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein spoke to KPBS about her Green New Deal Program.
Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein spoke to KPBS about her Green New Deal Program.
Presidential Candidate Supporting A ‘Green’ New Deal Program
Almost 80 years after the Great Depression, a presidential candidate is talking about implementing another public works program.

Almost 80 years after the Great Depression, a presidential candidate is talking about implementing another public works program. This time, it's Green Party leader Jill Stein who says a "Green New Deal" will help a tanking economy.

Tucked in a corner behind the San Diego State University residence halls, Stein rallied students and supporters. She's in San Diego trying to light a fire for students to make a difference in this election.

She said students are missing from the agendas of the two main presidential candidates.

"We talk about generational justice in our campaign, about the need to really be caring for our younger generation which is no where to be found, it's missing in action on the agenda of the Democratic and Republican parties," she said.

Stein has been holding events at universities across the nation, speaking to students about her proposed Green New Deal program, which she says could create 25 million jobs.

Modeled after Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal, Stein said her plan creates a sustainable economy based on sustainable green energy -- clean renewables like solar and wind power. She cites Iceland and Germany for their success with similar programs.

"The United States has the ingenuity, we have the resources, we have the creativity, we should be leading the way and developing that green sector of our economy, which is going to be needed world-over to cope with the crisis on our hands," Stein said.

Massachusetts-based Stein is promoting her candidacy on social media. The Green Party is expected to spend just $1 million on her campaign.

She said she's running for president because the political system needs to be fixed and politicians need to focus on people, not on corporations.

She also spoke at the University of San Diego today, with plans to speak at other universities across California within the next few days.