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Study Finds Strong Link Between Soda And Obesity

Photo by Tim Boyle / Getty Images

Above: A heavyset man passes cartons of Coca-Cola displayed in a grocery store in Des Plaines, Illinois.

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A new study shows about six out of ten San Diego adolescents drink at least one soda or sugary soft drink a day. The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research says there's a strong correlation between soft drink consumption and weight.

— A new study shows about six out of ten San Diego adolescents drink at least one soda or sugary soft drink a day. The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research says there's a strong correlation between soft drink consumption and weight.

Teenagers are the biggest consumers of soft drinks. But adults like them, too. The UCLA study reveals one out of five adults in San Diego drinks at least one sugary soda a day.

UCLA research scientist Susan Babey wrote the study. She says adults who have one or more soft drinks a day are 27 percent more likely to be overweight.

"We tend to drink soda like it's water," Babey points out. "But it's not water, and every 20 ounce soda has an average of 17 teaspoons of sugar, which isn't very good for us."

Babey says over the last 30 years, Americans' daily caloric intake has gone up. An increase in soft drink consumption has been a big part of it.

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