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Encinitas’ Proposition A Attracts Thousands In Last-Minute Contributions

Encinitas, 2013

Encinitas voters head to the polls Tuesday for a special election on future development.

Last-minute contributions in the thousands of dollars have popped up on the Encinitas City Clerk's campaign contribution website.

Aired 6/18/13 on KPBS News.

Prop A, a voter initiative in Encinitas, has attracted thousands of dollars in last-minute contributions. The result of Tuesday's special election on what's known as the “right-to-vote initiative" will affect future development in the coastal community.

Supporters of Proposition A want to maintain the original laid-back ambiance of their coastal town and said the initiative will give residents the right to vote on future developments that are denser or higher than the city's general plan allows.

They’ve raised about $17,000, including about $8,000 in free advertising from the local paper, The Coast News.

But opponents of the initiative have raised closer to $70,000 with thousands of dollars in last-minute contributions. Those contributions include $10,000 from the California Association of Realtors Political Action Committee recorded less than a week before the election. Shea Homes, one of the developers that contributed to efforts to defeat the initiative, gave $5,000. The National Association of Realtors, based in Chicago, also donated $8,000 in polling data to the opponents.

As the economy improves and development resumes, the outcome of Proposition A could be a bellwether for communities around the region trying to maintain local control on growth. It is the second city in San Diego County after Escondido to put the issue on the ballot.

Encinitas has a population of fewer than 60,000 people and is expected to grow to about 75,000 by 2040.

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