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Hometowns Of Undocumented Central American Children Among World’s Most Violent

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Origin Of Central American Children Caught Crossing The Border Illegally

Origin Of Central American Children Caught Crossing The Border Illegally

DHS report on the origin of unaccompanied alien ...

Many of the Central American children overwhelming authorities at the U.S. Southwest border left cities that rank among the world’s most violent, according to an internal government report.

The coastal Honduran city of San Pedro Sula was by far the most common origin of Central American children caught by Border Patrol while trying to sneak across the U.S. border over a 4½ month period; nearly three times as many children said they came from San Pedro Sula than from any other city in Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador.

San Pedro Sula has the highest murder rate in the world — around four times higher than that of the most violent U.S. city, Detroit.

San Salvador and Guatemala City were also among the top 10 hometowns of children caught by the Border Patrol. The murder rates of both are among the top 30 highest in the world, according to data complied by a Mexico-based security think tank. (Guatemala City’s murder rate was the eighth highest in the world in 2013, with more than 2,000 murders among a population of 3.1 million.)

The figures on child migrants comes from an infographic produced by the Department of Homeland Security and made public by Adam Isacson, an analyst at the non-profit Washington Office on Latin America. The report is based on Border Patrol apprehensions of undocumented children from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador between Jan. 1 and May 14 of this year.

The second most common city of origin of children caught at the border was Tegucigalpa, the Honduran capital and the sixth most murderous metropolis in the world.

The third most common hometown was Juticalpa, Honduras, the capital of a rural Honduran province that has become a major drug trafficking area in recent years.

U.S. border agents have taken more than 52,000 children into custody at the Southwest border since October 2013. The vast majority of the children caught trying to cross the border illegally are from Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Mexico, and most of them have been caught in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

The influx is straining federal resources at the border and forcing a reshuffling of staff in the federal government’s largest law enforcement agency, Customs and Border Protection. At the same time, the need to find housing for the children has sparked controversy in cities and towns across the country, including in Escondido, where the federal government failed in a bid to open a 96-bed temporary shelter for unaccompanied immigrant children.

Some Republican members of Congress are blaming the crisis on the Obama administration, saying its lax enforcement of immigration laws is giving Central Americans false hopes that they can stay in the U.S after crossing the border illegally.

But Central America experts point to a variety of factors causing the surge, including violence, poverty and the desire to reunite with family members in the U.S.

The leaked DHS report speculates on factors driving Central American children from different parts of the region.

The report states:

“We assess these reasons vary regionally. For example, many Guatemalan children come from rural areas, indicating they are probably seeking economic opportunities in the U.S. Salvadoran and Honduran children, on the other hand, come from extremely violent regions where they probably perceive the risk of traveling alone to the U.S. preferable to remaining at home.”

The report concludes that “the violence, combined with poor economies and other secondary factors will make stemming the flow of UACs to the U.S. a very complex issue to address.” (UAC is an acronym for Unaccompanied Alien Children, an official term.)

Comments

Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | June 30, 2014 at 2:30 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

And why is this our problem? Throw them back over the fence.

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Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | June 30, 2014 at 3:59 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

My thoughts exactly muckypoop - not our problem. If they want their country to be better, they need to work hard to change it.

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | July 1, 2014 at 1:11 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Why is this our problem?

Maybe it's because we are human beings who actually care about fellow human beings regardless of what nationality they are?

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | July 1, 2014 at 7:47 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Then please help them as much as you feel you should while I help them as much as I feel I should. As for our government helping them.... we have bigger problems to solve first.

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Avatar for user 'DSpurgeon'

DSpurgeon | July 1, 2014 at 8:01 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

I got mine, now now you get yours. Where have I heard that before?

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | July 1, 2014 at 9:29 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

benz, this wasn't planned, these people showed up on our doorstep so to speak.

Isn't there some humanity that comes with making sure they get basic necessities (food, water, shelter, medical care) at least while they are in our hands for processing?

That's all the proposal in Escondido was for - to house these people until they could be processed - it was not a permanent housing complex being proposed.

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Avatar for user 'CaliforniaDefender'

CaliforniaDefender | July 1, 2014 at 9:33 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

If we put 1/10th of the money spent on the pointless Iraq/Afghan wars towards combating human trafficking and assisting the governments of Mexico and Central America, it would pay us back 10 fold by reducing illegal aliens and their drain on our public services, economy, and culture.

Unlike Iraq/Afghanistan, which pays us back in nothing but body bags and refugees.

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Avatar for user 'CaliforniaDefender'

CaliforniaDefender | July 1, 2014 at 9:40 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Duck,

With the current weak policies towards illegal aliens, particular in California, I would not trust the processing center (and their laughable 6 ft chain link fence) to keep them there until deportation.

If they escape, Sacramento will turn them into burdens that we can never get rid of.

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | July 1, 2014 at 9:47 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

PDSD, it was certainly planned by somebody. They are not here by accident but rather because they expect us to care for them. We are not the nannies of the world. We are being taken advantage of here. I did not cause the conditions in their home country. How is it I am liable for their care and feeding? Isn't that appeal for humanity (a term I find to be misleading by the way, perhaps you meant compassion?) you evoke more appropriately laid at the feet of those governing their home nations? Where does this end? How many people are you willing to take personal financial responsibility for?

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | July 1, 2014 at 9:54 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Again, I'm not looking at this as a long-term responsibility.

I am looking at it in terms of a refugee crisis where human beings need immediate care.

I think what happens to them long-term is a more complicated discussion, because I do see two sides of the story.

However, I think what happens to them while they are in our custody waiting for our process to unfold is a much less complicated question - there is need for immediate humanitarian assistance.

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | July 1, 2014 at 10:01 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

PDSD, Would you accept a situation where they are given one meal while they wait the few hours required to stamp their entry illegal and deport them? Why do we need a housing facility within a few minutes’ drive of the border?

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Avatar for user 'Peking_Duck_SD'

Peking_Duck_SD | July 1, 2014 at 10:16 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

I'm sure you will disagree with me, but I think when there is a refugee crisis it's more complicated than stamping a passport and deporting them.

First off, where do we deport them to? They aren't from Mexico, they are from Central America. We can't just throw them into Mexico.

Second, I think it's reasonable that if the minors have adult family members who are residing in the United States and working/paying taxes and have the means to support them and are willing to take them, that option should be explored prior to deportation.

And I do think we need to consider the situation in the home country prior to deportations. There needs to be a high-bar, I am not in favor of not deporting people just because of "bad conditions", however if conditions actually present physical safety concerns then I think we do need to take that into consideration prior to deportation. I don't know if that's the case here, I'm not very familiar with the current situation on the ground in Central America, but I do think we need to take these things into consideration before just "throwing" someone back.

I think there needs to be balance. I agree that the United Stated does need to lookout for our own interests, but I also believe in basic human rights that should be adhered to regardless of one's nationality.

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | July 1, 2014 at 10:34 a.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Well, while there is a fair bit I do disagree with I think we can find some common ground. I'm not proposing sending them back to concentration camps or gulags. The high bar you describe, and that I agree with must be very high indeed and I have not seen a report that would seem to clear it. Recall that we are not obliged to shelter the populations of Darfur or Rwanda when conditions far inferior existed in those countries.

PDSD "We can't just throw them into Mexico."

Yes we can, that is how they got to us. We deport them to the closest border. We are not liable for their transportation any further. Mexico let them cross, Mexico can deal with them. Perhaps if Mexico were seeing the problems they caused by allowing transit to our border they would be disincentivized to allow it and enforce their own entry policy instead of passing the problem north.

PDSD " I think it's reasonable that if the minors have adult family members who are residing in the United States and working/paying taxes and have the means to support them and are willing to take them, that option should be explored prior to deportation."

In that case, why would we need a housing facility in Escondido? Someone is already feeding and housing them until their application can be evaluated.

I will ask again, why does this responsibility fall on us instead of their home nation or any of the nations they transited? How is it we are the ones left holding the bag without the ability to decline?

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Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | July 1, 2014 at 1:59 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Some people will not be happy until this country becomes the same status as Mexico. Corrupt, dumbed down and lazy. Anyone who believes this influx of minors is not orchestrated, is naive at best.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | July 1, 2014 at 2:36 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

_ckkkapoop1 no one asked you. Crawl back into the swamp until you stop making stupid remarks like the following:

"Corrupt, dumbed down and lazy. Anyone who believes this influx of minors is not orchestrated, is naive at best"

This story isn't about Mexicans, Muckkkapoop1, but if you think they are so lazy, then your janitorial job at the trailer parkkk should be secure.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | July 1, 2014 at 2:41 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

CA OFFENDER, if you listened to the 11am program on KPBS, and I REALLY hope you did in order to learn and inform youself, which you so desperately need on this subject, Everard Meade from the University of San Diego said that the adults would have to wear ankle bracelets. Kind hard to flee with ankle bracelet and child in tow, don't you think, Off?

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | July 1, 2014 at 2:45 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Muckkkapoop1 says that some people will not be happy until we become a Third World country.

Well, the contradictions of Capitalism will take care of that on their own with no help from anyone:

Paul Volker, : "The standard of living of the average American has to decline." NY Times, 1979

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Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | July 1, 2014 at 5:41 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Praise God for the fine people of Murrieta for standing up for their city's rights to make a good choice.

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Avatar for user 'Boots'

Boots | July 1, 2014 at 10:49 p.m. ― 5 months, 2 weeks ago

Why is posting wildly off-topic continually tolerated?

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