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Migrants Stage Second Protest At San Diego Border

Sixteen migrants were detained at the U.S.-Mexico border near San Diego on Thursday in the second demonstration this week held to protest U.S. immigration law.

Aired 3/14/14 on KPBS News.

Activists with the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, which organized the protest, said a total of 16 men and 15 children were detained on Thursday. Most of the adults were born in Mexico.

The group approached the Otay Mesa Port of Entry with the intent to ask for asylum. Many were accompanied by their U.S.-born children, who travelled to Mexico to join the protest.

Joselyn Rodriguez, a 22-year-old U.S. Army specialist, said her father, Florencio Rodriguez, was detained along with two of his other daughters, ages 11 and 13. Both are U.S. citizens.

Florencio Rodriguez was deported from the U.S. three years ago, his older daughter said.

Activists with the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, which organized the protest, said a total of 16 men and 15 children were detained on Thursday. Most of the adults were born in Mexico.

This is the fourth time since last year that NIYA has organized a group of migrants — most of them deportees and young people brought to the U.S. as children — to seek asylum at ports of entry along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Most of the migrants in the first two groups, which crossed last year at Nogales, Ariz., and Laredo, Texas, were released and allowed to start the process of seeking asylum.

The third group, made up of 35 adult migrants and several children, was detained at Otay Mesa on Monday. One person in that group has been deported back to Mexico.

Some of the children were released to relatives in the U.S. and one was taken into custody by child welfare authorities, according to Dulce Guerrero, an organizer with NIYA. The rest of the group has been taken to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention center in Otay Mesa.

The protests have been controversial among some immigration lawyers and activists, and have raised concerns among some U.S. legislators about abuse of the asylum system.

Plus, only a tiny fraction of Mexican asylum seekers win their cases.

But NIYA spokeswoman Cynthia Marroquin said the tactic has allowed many of the participants in the previous demonstrations to reunite with their families in the U.S.

“A lot of them already have a work permit and they’re fighting their cases from inside instead of being on the other side of the border separated from their families,” Marroquin said. “So I think that’s already a win.”

Joselyn Rodriguez said her family decided Florencio, her father, should join the protest as a last hope.

“I don’t think as a soldier I could be where I’m at today (without him),” she said. “And my little sisters are missing out on that.”

Comments

Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | March 14, 2014 at 9 a.m. ― 6 months ago

About time we used these protests as a round-up. Protests cost police time and money. Let's get some bang for the buck. Round em up---ship em out.

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Avatar for user 'COEnygaard'

COEnygaard | March 14, 2014 at 9:20 a.m. ― 6 months ago

A lot of these people are citizens, and the people that would be deported are their caretakers.

The importance of these protest is more complex then I believe you really understand. Some of these individuals are looking for the type of assistance that legally they are qualified for but because of the way we enforce these specific laws they do not get a fair opportunity to fight there case.

Its easy to look at the situation from a stance of "well they are getting what they deserve..". I am assuming that you would not leave your country to have children in another, but imagination that kind of separation. I know that if i was separated from my son I would protest everyday until I could be reunited, even if I wasn't completely correct in my approach.

Not to mention that protesting is a fundamental element of what it means to be American, even before we had our own sovereignty.

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Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | March 14, 2014 at 10:20 a.m. ― 6 months ago

They are upset that they got deported after living here illegally? Tough s---. They knew what they were doing.

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | March 14, 2014 at 10:46 a.m. ― 6 months ago

COE, in the situation you hypothesize, why would you not bring your dependent to live with you? That seems like the simpler route.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | March 14, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. ― 6 months ago

CONEYISLAND, _uckkkapoop1 doesn't know the meaning of complex, so tht would be a useless effort. He would like to return to the days of the Palmer Raids.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | March 14, 2014 at 12:30 p.m. ― 6 months ago

John Markkk, deportations are a civil proceeding; not a criminal one.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | March 14, 2014 at 12:35 p.m. ― 6 months ago

Errr, BENZZZ, mmmaybe because they were attending school, huh? Or mmmaybe because they were from a two-parent home and one of the parents stayed behind??? There are as many stories here as there are persons protesting. Ah, but not for Benzzz here--it must be either this or that. None other.

As I pointed out in the other article, some of the protesters were PARENTS. This was stated in the KGTV 10 story.

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Avatar for user 'benz72'

benz72 | March 14, 2014 at 1:57 p.m. ― 6 months ago

MA, perhaps you could let the poster who was addressed answer the question. Thanks.

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Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | March 14, 2014 at 3:15 p.m. ― 6 months ago

Mission what is your point? I said they got deported after living here illegally. They lived here illegally, they were breaking the law by merely existing in this country. And then they got deported.

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Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | March 14, 2014 at 6:55 p.m. ― 6 months ago

Only in America. They sneak in the country (felony). They birth their kids for free in the hospitals (Americans are paying $20-30,000/kid). They never learn our language. They work under the radar (no taxes). They get deported. Then they have the nerve to protest about being separated from their kid. I say "tough tacos" to that.

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Avatar for user 'COEnygaard'

COEnygaard | March 16, 2014 at 9:44 a.m. ― 6 months ago

A lot of them do pay taxes, just because you don't have a social security number does not mean you are unable to pay taxes.

They do not necessarily come to America to have children, that is a very biased and one sided statement. Most are trying to improve their ability to have a decent life and if the system was more welcoming to this they would be fully placed in the system and pay for all the issues your stating. A lot of times they end up impregnated while already in the United States under B visas etc.

They are not felons for sneaking into America, only the second time is it considered a felony, If after deportation you again decide to sneak back into the United States of America then you will be considered a felon.

They would learn our language if we didn't corral, which we accomplish by holding this kind of aggressive thoughts towards them, them into communities filled only with undocumented immigrants or Latin Americans. Because of this business that caterers to their needs arise.

Lets look at the base problem though. The reason they come here is because employers hire them. American citizens hire undocumented immigrants illegally so that they, the company, can avoid paying taxes. With out this resource I doubt that these "illegals" would risk their life to cross the border for nothing. Or maybe if American companies doing business in Mexico, and other countries, paid the local people a livable wage then there would be no need to sneak into the united states. There is a huge ratio of workers in Tijuana and other Mexican states that work at American owned factories and get paid $55.00 or less per week. Factories that provide the medical supplies for you so that you can go to the hospital, parts for your cars so that you drive your Toyota, Ford, etc, factories that build the guns like colt, etc, so that you can defend your freedom.

With out Mexico and its citizens, America would be in a tough position to provide the lifestyle you are so accustomed too. But I guess they are just criminals who do not deserve a fair chance to improve their living standards to have a stable life for their family.

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Avatar for user 'Missionaccomplished'

Missionaccomplished | March 16, 2014 at 10:43 p.m. ― 6 months ago

Yes, John Markkk, not talking to an customs/immigration officer. Horror of horrors. THAT is my POINT.

As to the other, Benzzz is assuming all their circumstances are carbon copies of each other. I am trying, unsuccessfully, to communicate to him that each person has their own set of circumstances. But that of course, is too complicated for someone who sees with blinders.

And also to add, to what CONEY says, deportations are CIVIL proceedings--although there seems to be some resistance here to that fact. It was ONLY until 1996, that a Repuke controlled Congress, artificially expanded what would be considered an "aggravated felony."

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Avatar for user 'muckapoo1'

muckapoo1 | March 18, 2014 at 8:40 a.m. ― 6 months ago

COE. My lifestyle is not due to foreign infiltrators. It is because of obeying the law, working, saving. There is no way that illegals pay for themselves, let alone make my life better. If they all stayed home, we would save billions. Maybe the price of tomatoes would go up a dime, but we would be ahead in the long run.

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Avatar for user 'JeanMarc'

JeanMarc | March 18, 2014 at 11:48 a.m. ― 6 months ago

Simple solution: Fine every business $50,000 for each illegal immigrant they hire. Fine people $10,000 for hiring a day laborer outside Home Depot. Remove the demand. These people won't come here if they cannot earn money.

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Avatar for user 'COEnygaard'

COEnygaard | March 18, 2014 at 10:25 p.m. ― 5 months, 4 weeks ago

"There is no way that illegals pay for themselves, let alone make my life better." - They pay for themselves the same way that you do. They purchase items within the United States and pay rent within the United States. There money gets cycled within the system just like yours.

"If they all stayed home, we would save billions. Maybe the price of tomatoes would go up a dime, but we would be ahead in the long run." - This makes no sense.

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